"Residual Functional Capacity Form - Adult Anxiety Related Mental Disorder"

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THESE ARE THE FORMS I USE – THIS IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE AND INTENDED TO
SUPPLEMENT YOUR PARTICULAR FACTUAL SITUATION ONLY – It is crucial you educate
yourself on the Social Security Regulations that define and govern impairments prior to preparing this
form for review. These forms are used to enhance the provider’s understanding of the purpose of the
assessment and the impact of their evaluation. It includes SSA definitions while combining the
traditional SSA standard form.
This form addresses only Anxiety Related Disorders. As an attorney or an individual representing
yourself it is important to combine multiple diagnoses in your RFC, if they are present and diagnosed.
The Surgeon General estimated that about one half of those who have a primary diagnosis of major
depression also have an anxiety disorder. Comorbidities of multiple mental diagnoses and combined
physical diagnoses are common. Mental diagnoses include substance abuse, mood disorder and
personality disorders, and often combined with physical illnesses. A federal district court has
recognized the mental health disease of schizoaffective disorder as a combination of schizophrenia and
bipolar disorder, resulting in severe changes in mood and some of the psychotic symptoms of
schizophrenia, such as hallucinations, delusions, and disorganized thinking.
Lee Ann Torrans
RESIDUAL FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY – ADULT
ANXIETY RELATED MENTAL DISORDER
Name:
SSN:
DOB:
Health Care Provider Name:
Health Care Provider Relationship to Patient:
When First Treated Patient:
How Often Sees Patient:
Primary Diagnosis:
Date of Onset*:
Secondary Diagnosis:
Date of Onset:
Other Impairments:
Date of Onset:
Date of Onset is defined as the first day the claimant meets the definition of disability as defined in the Act and regulations.
Purpose of Medical Evidence and of RFC:
(1) Establish the presence of a medically determinable mental impairment(s),
(2) Assess the degree of functional limitation the impairment(s) imposes, and
(3) Project the probable duration of the impairment(s).
RFC is based upon:
Page 1 of 7
THESE ARE THE FORMS I USE – THIS IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE AND INTENDED TO
SUPPLEMENT YOUR PARTICULAR FACTUAL SITUATION ONLY – It is crucial you educate
yourself on the Social Security Regulations that define and govern impairments prior to preparing this
form for review. These forms are used to enhance the provider’s understanding of the purpose of the
assessment and the impact of their evaluation. It includes SSA definitions while combining the
traditional SSA standard form.
This form addresses only Anxiety Related Disorders. As an attorney or an individual representing
yourself it is important to combine multiple diagnoses in your RFC, if they are present and diagnosed.
The Surgeon General estimated that about one half of those who have a primary diagnosis of major
depression also have an anxiety disorder. Comorbidities of multiple mental diagnoses and combined
physical diagnoses are common. Mental diagnoses include substance abuse, mood disorder and
personality disorders, and often combined with physical illnesses. A federal district court has
recognized the mental health disease of schizoaffective disorder as a combination of schizophrenia and
bipolar disorder, resulting in severe changes in mood and some of the psychotic symptoms of
schizophrenia, such as hallucinations, delusions, and disorganized thinking.
Lee Ann Torrans
RESIDUAL FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY – ADULT
ANXIETY RELATED MENTAL DISORDER
Name:
SSN:
DOB:
Health Care Provider Name:
Health Care Provider Relationship to Patient:
When First Treated Patient:
How Often Sees Patient:
Primary Diagnosis:
Date of Onset*:
Secondary Diagnosis:
Date of Onset:
Other Impairments:
Date of Onset:
Date of Onset is defined as the first day the claimant meets the definition of disability as defined in the Act and regulations.
Purpose of Medical Evidence and of RFC:
(1) Establish the presence of a medically determinable mental impairment(s),
(2) Assess the degree of functional limitation the impairment(s) imposes, and
(3) Project the probable duration of the impairment(s).
RFC is based upon:
Page 1 of 7
1. A comprehensive mental status examination which generally includes a narrative description of
appearance, behavior, and speech; thought process (e.g., loosening of associations); thought content
(e.g., delusions); perceptual abnormalities (e.g., hallucinations); mood and affect (e.g., depression,
mania); sensorium and cognition (e.g., orientation, recall, memory, concentration, fund of information,
and intelligence); and judgment and insight. The individual case facts determine the specific areas of
mental status that need to be emphasized during the examination.
2. Psychological testing. Reference to a "standardized psychological test" indicates the use of a
psychological test measure that has appropriate validity, reliability, and norms, and is individually
administered by a qualified specialist. "Qualified" is defined as a specialist currently licensed or
certified in the State to administer, score, and interpret psychological tests and have the training and
experience to perform the test.
Psychological tests should the specialist's observations regarding the patient’s ability to sustain
attention and concentration, relate appropriately to the specialist, and perform tasks independently
(without prompts or reminders). The test results should include both the objective data and any clinical
observations.
Neuropsychological assessments. Comprehensive neuropsychological examinations may be used to
establish the existence and extent of compromise of brain function, particularly in cases involving
organic mental disorders. Normally, these examinations include assessment of cerebral dominance,
basic sensation and perception, motor speed and coordination, attention and concentration, visual-
motor function, memory across verbal and visual modalities, receptive and expressive speech, higher-
order linguistic operations, problem-solving, abstraction ability, and general intelligence.
In addition, there should be a clinical interview geared toward evaluating pathological features known
to occur frequently in neurological disease and trauma; e.g., emotional lability, abnormality of mood,
impaired impulse control, passivity and apathy, or inappropriate social behavior. The specialist
performing the examination may administer one of the commercially available comprehensive
neuropsychological batteries, such as the Luria-Nebraska or the Halstead-Reitan, or a battery of tests
selected as relevant to the suspected brain dysfunction. The specialist performing the examination must
be properly trained in this area of neuroscience.
Considerations of Mitigating Factors
Chronic mental impairments. Particular problems are often involved in evaluating mental
impairments in individuals who have long histories of repeated hospitalizations or prolonged outpatient
care with supportive therapy and medication. If the patient’s life structured in such a way to minimize
stress and reduce symptoms and signs this should be noted. The patient may be more impaired for
work symptoms and signs would indicate.
Effects of structured settings. Chronic mental disorders, overt symptomatology may be controlled or
attenuated by psychosocial factors such as placement in a hospital, halfway house, board and care
facility. Highly structured and supportive settings may also be found at home. Mental demands from
these environments may reduce overt symptoms and signs of the underlying mental disorder while the
Page 2 of 7
ability to function outside of such a structured or supportive setting may not have changed. The
symptomatology may be controlled or attenuated by psychosocial factors.
Effects of medication. The functional limitations in assessing impairment severity and the effects of
medication on symptoms, signs, and ability to function are considered. Drugs used to modify
psychological functions and mental states may control certain primary manifestations of a mental
disorder, e.g., hallucinations, impaired attention, restlessness, or hyperactivity, such treatment may not
affect all functional limitations imposed by the mental disorder.
In cases where overt symptomatology is attenuated by the use of such drugs, particular attention must
be focused on the functional limitations that may persist.
_________________________________________
Anxiety Related Disorders – Circle those symptoms present in patient as indicated
below:
Anxiety disorders. In cases involving agoraphobia and other phobic disorders, panic disorders, and
posttraumatic stress disorders, documentation of the anxiety reaction is essential. At least one detailed
description of a typical reaction is required. The description should include the nature, frequency, and
duration of any panic attacks or other reactions, the precipitating and exacerbating factors, and the
functional effects.
If the description is provided by a medical source, the reporting physician or psychologist should
indicate the extent to which the description reflects his or her own observations and the source of any
ancillary information. Statements of other persons who have observed these events be used for this
description if professional observation is not available.
12.06 Anxiety-related disorders: In these disorders anxiety is either the predominant disturbance or it
is experienced if the individual attempts to master symptoms; for example, confronting the dreaded
object or situation in a phobic disorder or resisting the obsessions or compulsions in obsessive
compulsive disorders.
The required level of severity for these disorders is met when the requirements in both A and B are
satisfied, or when the requirements in both A and C are satisfied.
A. Medically documented findings of at least one of the following:
1. Generalized persistent anxiety accompanied by three out of four of the following
signs or symptoms:
a. Motor tension; or
b. Autonomic hyperactivity; or
c. Apprehensive expectation; or
Page 3 of 7
d. Vigilance and scanning; or
2. A persistent irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation which results in a
compelling desire to avoid the dreaded object, activity, or situation; or
3. Recurrent severe panic attacks manifested by a sudden unpredictable onset of intense
apprehension, fear, terror and sense of impending doom occurring on the average of at
least once a week; or
4. Recurrent obsessions or compulsions which are a source of marked distress; or
5. Recurrent and intrusive recollections of a traumatic experience, which are a source of
marked distress;
AND
B. Resulting in at least two of the following:
1. Marked* restriction of activities of daily living; or
2. Marked difficulties in maintaining social functioning; or
3. Marked difficulties in maintaining concentration, persistence, or pace; or
4. Repeated episodes of decompensation, each of extended duration.
OR
C. Resulting in complete inability to function independently outside the area of one's home.
"
Marked" is defined as a standard for measuring the degree of limitation, it means more than
moderate but less than extreme. A marked limitation may arise when several activities or functions
are impaired, or even when only one is impaired, as long as the degree of limitation is such as to
interfere seriously with ability to function independently, appropriately, effectively, and on a
sustained basis. See §§ 404.1520a and 416.920a.
Impairment Definitions:
(1) No impairment
(2) Mild impairment: No significant interference with the ability to perform basic work-related
activities
(3) Moderate impairment: Significant interference with the ability to perform one or more basic
work-related activities
(4) Marked impairment: Very significant interference with the ability to perform one or more
basic work-related activities
(5) Severe impairment: Inability to perform one or more basic work-related activities.
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Mental Abilities of Patient
UNDERSTANDING, CARRYING OUT, AND REMEMBERING SIMPLE INSTRUCTIONS
Mild
Moderate
Marked
Severe
No
Impairment
Impairment
Impairment
Impairment
Impairment
The ability to remember locations
and work-like procedures.
The ability to understand and
remember very short and simple
instructions.
The ability to carry out very short
and simple instructions.
The ability to maintain concentration
and attention for extended periods
(the approximately 2-hour segments
between arrival and first break,
lunch, second break, and departure).
The ability to perform activities
within a schedule, maintain regular
attendance, and be punctual within
customary tolerances.
Mild
Moderate
Marked
Severe
No
Impairment
Impairment
Impairment
Impairment
Impairment
The ability to sustain an ordinary
routine without special supervision.
The ability to work in coordination
with or proximity to others without
being (unduly) distracted by them.
The ability to complete a normal
workday and workweek without
interruptions from psychologically
based symptoms and to perform at a
consistent pace without an
unreasonable number and length of
rest periods.
USE OF JUDGMENT
Mild
Moderate
Marked
Severe
No
Impairment
Impairment
Impairment
Impairment
Impairment
The ability to make simple work-
related decisions.
The ability to be aware of normal
hazards and take appropriate
precautions.
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