Would Banning Firearms Reduce Murder and Suicide? a Review of International Evidence - Don B. Kates, Gary Mauser

ADVERTISEMENT
 
W
B
F
R
 
OULD 
ANNING 
IREARMS 
EDUCE
M
S
URDER AND 
UICIDE
A
R
I
 
 
EVIEW OF 
NTERNATIONAL AND
S
D
E
 
OME 
OMESTIC 
VIDENCE
D
B.
K
G
M
 
*
**
ON 
 
ATES
 AND 
ARY 
AUSER
I
............................................................650
NTRODUCTION
I.
V
:
T
D
 
IOLENCE
 
HE 
ECISIVENESS OF
S
F
...................................................660
OCIAL 
ACTORS
II. A
W
Q
..........................662
SKING THE 
RONG 
UESTION
III. D
O
P
M
?........................665
RDINARY 
EOPLE 
URDER
IV. M
G
,
L
C
?....................................670
ORE 
UNS
 
ESS 
RIME
V. G
,
H
D
EOGRAPHIC
 
ISTORICAL AND 
EMOGRAPHIC 
P
...............................................................673
ATTERNS
A. Demographic Patterns ..................................676
B. Macro‐historical Evidence: From the 
Middle Ages to the 20
th
 Century .................678
C. Later and More Specific Macro‐Historical 
Evidence..........................................................684
D. Geographic Patterns within Nations ..........685
                                                                                                                   
* Don B. Kates (LL.B., Yale, 1966) is an American criminologist and constitutional 
lawyer associated with the Pacific Research Institute, San Francisco. He may be con‐
tacted at dbkates@earthlink.net; 360‐666‐2688; 22608 N.E. 269th Ave., Battle Ground, 
WA 98604. 
** Gary Mauser (Ph.D., University of California, Irvine, 1970) is a Canadian crimi‐
nologist and university professor at Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC Canada. 
He  may  be  contacted  at  www.garymauser.net,  mauser@sfu.ca,  and  604‐291‐3652. 
We gratefully acknowledge the generous contributions of Professor Thomas B. Cole 
(University  of  North  Carolina  at  Chapel  Hill,  Social  Medicine  and  Epidemiology); 
Chief  Superintendent  Colin  Greenwood  (West  Yorkshire  Constabulary,  ret.);  C.B. 
Kates;  Abigail  Kohn  (University  of  Sydney,  Law);  David  B.  Kopel  (Independence 
Institute);  Professor  Timothy  D.  Lytton  (Albany  Law  School);  Professor  William 
Alex  Pridemore  (University  of  Oklahoma,  Sociology);  Professor  Randolph  Roth 
(Ohio  State  University,  History);  Professor  Thomas  Velk  (McGill  University,  Eco‐
nomics  and  Chairman  of  the  North  American  Studies  Program);  Professor  Robert 
Weisberg  (Stanford  Law  School);  and  John  Whitley  (University  of  Adelaide,  Eco‐
nomics).  Any merits of  this paper reflect  their advice and contributions; errors  are 
entirely ours. 
 
W
B
F
R
 
OULD 
ANNING 
IREARMS 
EDUCE
M
S
URDER AND 
UICIDE
A
R
I
 
 
EVIEW OF 
NTERNATIONAL AND
S
D
E
 
OME 
OMESTIC 
VIDENCE
D
B.
K
G
M
 
*
**
ON 
 
ATES
 AND 
ARY 
AUSER
I
............................................................650
NTRODUCTION
I.
V
:
T
D
 
IOLENCE
 
HE 
ECISIVENESS OF
S
F
...................................................660
OCIAL 
ACTORS
II. A
W
Q
..........................662
SKING THE 
RONG 
UESTION
III. D
O
P
M
?........................665
RDINARY 
EOPLE 
URDER
IV. M
G
,
L
C
?....................................670
ORE 
UNS
 
ESS 
RIME
V. G
,
H
D
EOGRAPHIC
 
ISTORICAL AND 
EMOGRAPHIC 
P
...............................................................673
ATTERNS
A. Demographic Patterns ..................................676
B. Macro‐historical Evidence: From the 
Middle Ages to the 20
th
 Century .................678
C. Later and More Specific Macro‐Historical 
Evidence..........................................................684
D. Geographic Patterns within Nations ..........685
                                                                                                                   
* Don B. Kates (LL.B., Yale, 1966) is an American criminologist and constitutional 
lawyer associated with the Pacific Research Institute, San Francisco. He may be con‐
tacted at dbkates@earthlink.net; 360‐666‐2688; 22608 N.E. 269th Ave., Battle Ground, 
WA 98604. 
** Gary Mauser (Ph.D., University of California, Irvine, 1970) is a Canadian crimi‐
nologist and university professor at Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC Canada. 
He  may  be  contacted  at  www.garymauser.net,  mauser@sfu.ca,  and  604‐291‐3652. 
We gratefully acknowledge the generous contributions of Professor Thomas B. Cole 
(University  of  North  Carolina  at  Chapel  Hill,  Social  Medicine  and  Epidemiology); 
Chief  Superintendent  Colin  Greenwood  (West  Yorkshire  Constabulary,  ret.);  C.B. 
Kates;  Abigail  Kohn  (University  of  Sydney,  Law);  David  B.  Kopel  (Independence 
Institute);  Professor  Timothy  D.  Lytton  (Albany  Law  School);  Professor  William 
Alex  Pridemore  (University  of  Oklahoma,  Sociology);  Professor  Randolph  Roth 
(Ohio  State  University,  History);  Professor  Thomas  Velk  (McGill  University,  Eco‐
nomics  and  Chairman  of  the  North  American  Studies  Program);  Professor  Robert 
Weisberg  (Stanford  Law  School);  and  John  Whitley  (University  of  Adelaide,  Eco‐
nomics).  Any merits of  this paper reflect  their advice and contributions; errors  are 
entirely ours. 
650 
Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy 
[Vol. 30 
E. Geographic Comparisons: European 
Gun Ownership and Murder Rates ..........687
F. Geographic Comparisons: Gun‐Ownership 
and Suicide Rates ...........................................690
C
................................................................693
ONCLUSION
 
I
 
NTRODUCTION
International evidence and comparisons have long been offered 
as proof of the mantra that more guns mean more deaths and that 
fewer  guns,  therefore,  mean  fewer  deaths.
  Unfortunately,  such 
1
discussions are all too often been afflicted by misconceptions and 
factual error and focus on comparisons that are unrepresentative. 
T
It  may  be  useful  to  begin  with  a  few  examples. 
here  is  a  com‐
pound assertion that (a) guns are uniquely available in the United 
States compared with other modern developed nations, which is 
why  (b)  the  United  States  has  by  far  the  highest  murder  rate. 
Though these assertions have been endlessly repeated, statement 
(b) is, in fact, false and statement (a) is substantially so.  
Since at least 1965, the false assertion that the United States has 
the industrialized world’s highest murder rate has been an artifact 
of politically motivated Soviet minimization designed to hide the 
true homicide rates.
2
 Since well before that date, the Soviet Union 
                                                                                                                   
1. See,  e.g.,  J
G
,
M
USA:
T
W
W
K
E
O
281
OHN 
ODWIN
 
URDER 
 
HE 
AYS 
ILL 
ACH 
THER 
 
(1978)
(“Areas  with  the  highest  proportion  of  gun  owners  also  boast  the  highest 
 
homicide  ratios;  those  with  the  fewest  gun  owners  have  the  lowest.”);
N.
P
 
 
ETE 
S
,
G
D
D
,
P
D
64
(1981)
(quoting and endorsing an English 
HIELDS
 
UNS 
ON
IE
 
EOPLE 
 
 
academic’s  remark:  “We  cannot  help  but  believe  that  America  ought  to  share  the 
basic  premise  of  our  gun  legislation—that  the  availability  of  firearms  breeds  vio‐
lence.”);
Janice  Somerville,  Gun  Control  as  Immunization,
A
.
M
.
N
,
Jan.  3, 
 
 
M
 
ED
 
EWS
 
1994,  at  9  (quoting  public  health  activist  Katherine  Christoffel,  M.D.:  “Guns  are  a 
virus that must be eradicated . . . . Get rid of the guns, get rid of the bullets, and you 
get rid of the deaths.”); Deane Calhoun, From Controversy to Prevention: Building Ef‐
fective  Firearm  Policies,
I
.
P
N
N
.,
Winter  1989–90,  at  17 
 
NJ
 
ROTECTION 
ETWORK 
EWSL
 
(“[G]uns  are not just  an inanimate object  [sic],  but in  fact are a social  ill.”); see  also
 
W
C
&
V
W.
S
,
T
G
G
E
:
F
S
ENDY 
UKIER 
 
ICTOR 
 
IDEL
 
HE 
LOBAL 
UN 
PIDEMIC
 
ROM 
ATURDAY 
N
S
AK‐47
(2006);
Susan Baker, Without Guns, Do People Kill People? 
IGHT 
PECIALS TO 
 
75
A
.
J.
P
.
H
587
(1985);
Paul  Cotton,  Gun‐Associated  Violence  Increasingly 
 
M
 
 
UB
 
EALTH 
 
 
Viewed as Public Health Challenge, 267
J.
A
.
M
.
A
1171
(1992);
Diane Schetky, 
 
 
M
 
ED
 
SS
 
 
Children and Handguns: A Public Health Concern, 139
A
.
J.
D
.
C
.
229,
230
(1985);
 
M
 
 
IS
 
HILD
 
 
 
 
Lois  A.  Fingerhut  &  Joel  C.  Kleinman,  International  and  Interstate  Comparisons  of 
Homicides Among Young Males,
263
J.
A
.
M
.
A
3292,
3295
(1990). 
 
 
 
M
 
ED
 
SS
 
 
2. See William Alex Pridemore, Using Newly Available Homicide Data to Debunk Two 
Myths About Violence in an International Context: A Research Note, 5 H
S
OMICIDE 
TUD
267 (2001). 
No. 2]   Would Banning Firearms Reduce Murder and Suicide? 
651 
possessed extremely stringent gun controls
 that were effectuated 
3
by  a  police state apparatus  providing  stringent enforcement.
4
  So 
successful  was  that  regime  that  few  Russian  civilians  now  have 
firearms and very few murders involve them.
Yet, manifest suc‐
cess  in  keeping  its  people  disarmed  did  not  prevent  the  Soviet 
Union from having far and away the highest murder rate in the 
developed world.
 In the 1960s and early 1970s, the gun‐less So‐
6
viet Union’s murder rates paralleled or generally exceeded those 
of gun‐ridden America. While American rates stabilized and then 
steeply  declined,  however,  Russian  murder  increased  so  drasti‐
cally  that  by  the  early  1990s  the  Russian  rate  was  three  times 
higher than that of the United States. Between 1998‐2004 (the lat‐
est figure available for Russia), Russian murder rates were nearly 
four times higher than American rates. Similar murder rates also 
characterize  the  Ukraine,  Estonia,  Latvia,  Lithuania,  and  various 
other now‐independent European nations of the former U.S.S.R.
 
7
Thus, in the United States and the former Soviet Union transition‐
ing into current‐day Russia, “homicide results suggest that where 
                                                                                                                   
3. See  G
N
&
F
Z
,
F
V
EORGE 
EWTON 
 
RANKLIN 
IMRING
 
IREARMS  AND 
IOLENCE  IN 
A
:
A
S
R
S
N
C
MERICAN LIFE
 
 
TAFF 
EPORT 
UBMITTED TO THE 
ATIONAL 
OMMISSION ON THE 
C
P
V
 119 & n.3 (1970). 
AUSES AND 
REVENTION OF 
IOLENCE
4. Russian  law  flatly  prohibits  civilian  possession  of  handguns  and  limits  long 
guns  to  licensed  hunters.  Id.  For  more  on  the  stringency  of  enforcement,  see  Ray‐
mond Kessler, Gun Control and Political Power, 5 L
&
P
Q.
381, 389 (1983), and 
AW 
 
OL
 
Randy  E.  Barnett  &  Don  B.  Kates,  Under  Fire:  The  New  Consensus  on  the  Second 
Amendment, 45
E
L.
J.
1139,
1239 (1996) (noting an unusual further element of 
 
MORY 
 
 
 
Soviet gun policy: the Soviet Army adopted unique firearm calibers so that, even if 
its soldiers could not be prevented from returning with foreign gun souvenirs from 
foreign wars, ammunition for them would be unavailable in the Soviet Union). 
5. See Pridemore, supra note 2, at 271. 
6. Russian homicide data given in this article (for years 1965–99) were kindly sup‐
plied us by Professor Pridemore from his research in Russian ministry sources (on 
file with authors). See also infra Table 1 (reporting Russian homicide data for 2002). 
7. The highest U.S. homicide rate ever reported was 10.5 per 100,000 in 1980. See 
Jeffery A. Miron, Violence, Guns, and Drugs: A Cross‐Country Analysis, 44 J.L.
&
E
.
 
 
CON
 
615,
624–25
tbl.1
(2001). As of 2001, the rate was below 6. Id. The latest rates available 
 
 
 
for the Ukraine, Belarus, and other former Soviet nations in Europe come from the 
mid‐1990s, when all were well above 10 and most were 50% to 150% higher. Id. 
Note that the U.S. rates given above are rates reported by the FBI. There are two 
different  sources  of  U.S.  murder  rates.  The  FBI  murder  data  is  based  on  reports  it 
obtains from police agencies throughout the nation. These data are significantly less 
complete than the alternative (used in this article unless otherwise explicitly stated) 
rates of the U.S. Public Health Service, which are derived from data collected from 
medical examiners’ offices nationwide. Though the latter data are more comprehen‐
sive, and the Public Health Service murder rate is slightly higher, they have the dis‐
advantage of being slower to appear than the FBI homicide data. 
652 
Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy 
[Vol. 30 
guns are scarce other weapons are substituted in killings.”
 While 
8
American gun ownership is quite high, Table 1 shows many other 
developed  nations  (e.g.,  Norway,  Finland,  Germany,  France, 
Denmark)  with  high  rates  of  gun  ownership.  These  countries, 
however,  have  murder  rates  as  low  or  lower  than  many  devel‐
oped nations in which gun ownership is much rarer. For example, 
Luxembourg, where handguns are totally banned and ownership 
of  any  kind  of  gun  is  minimal,  had  a  murder  rate  nine  times 
higher than Germany in 2002.
 
9
Table 1: European Gun Ownership and Murder Rates 
 (rates given are per 100,000 people and in descending order) 
Nation 
Murder Rate 
Rate of Gun Ownership 
Russia 
20.54 [2002] 
4,000 
Luxembourg 
9.01 [2002] 
c. 0 
Hungary 
2.22 [2003] 
2,000 
Finland 
1.98 [2004] 
39,000 
Sweden 
1.87 [2001] 
24,000 
Poland 
1.79 [2003] 
1,500 
France 
1.65 [2003] 
30,000 
Denmark 
1.21 [2003] 
19,000 
Greece 
1.12 [2003] 
11,000 
Switzerland 
0.99 [2003] 
16,000 
Germany 
0.93 [2003] 
30,000 
Norway 
0.81 [2001] 
36,000 
Austria 
0.80 [2002] 
17,000 
Notes: This table covers all the Continental European nations for which 
the  two  data  sets  given  are  both  available.  In  every  case,  we  have  given 
the  homicide  data  for  2003  or  the  closest  year  thereto  because  that  is  the 
year of the publication from which the gun ownership data are taken. Gun 
ownership  data  comes  from  G
I
I
RADUATE 
NSTITUTE  OF 
NTERNATIONAL 
S
,
S
A
S
64 tbl.2.2, 65 tbl.2.3
(2003). 
TUDIES
 
MALL 
RMS 
URVEY 
 
 
The  homicide  rate  data  comes  from  an  annually  published  report, 
C
C
J
S
,
H
C
ANADIAN 
ENTRE  FOR 
USTICE 
TATISTICS
 
OMICIDE  IN 
ANADA
JURISTAT, for the years 2001–2004. Each year’s report gives homicide sta‐
tistics  for  a  dozen  or  so  foreign  nations  in  a  section  labeled  “Homicide 
Rates for Selected Countries.” This section of the reports gives no explana‐
                                                                                                                   
8. G
K
,
T
G
:
F
C
 20 (1997) (dis‐
ARY 
LECK
 
ARGETING 
UNS
 
IREARMS  AND  THEIR 
ONTROL
cussing patterns revealed by studies in the United States). 
9. Our assertions as to the legality of handguns are based on C
C
OMM
N ON 
RIME 
P
&
C
.
J
,
U.N.
E
.
&
S
.
C
,
U
N
REVENTION 
 
RIM
 
USTICE
 
 
CON
 
 
OC
 
OUNCIL
 
NITED 
ATIONS 
I
S
F
R
 26, tbl. 2‐1 (1997 draft). 
NTERNATIONAL 
TUDY ON 
IREARMS 
EGULATION
No. 2]   Would Banning Firearms Reduce Murder and Suicide? 
653 
tion of why it selects the various nations whose homicide statistics it cov‐
ers.  Also  without  explanation,  the  nations  covered  differ  from  year  to 
year.  Thus,  for  instance,  murder  statistics  for  Germany  and  Hungary  are 
given  in  all  four  of  the  pamphlets  (2001,  2002,  2003,  2004),  for  Russia  in 
three years (2001, 2002, and 2004), for France in two years (2001 and 2003), 
and for Norway and Sweden in only one year (2001). 
 
The  same  pattern  appears  when  comparisons  of  violence  to 
gun ownership are made within nations. Indeed, “data on fire‐
arms  ownership  by  constabulary  area  in  England,”  like  data 
from the United States, show “a negative correlation,”
 that is, 
10
“where firearms are most dense violent crime rates are lowest, 
and  where  guns  are  least  dense  violent  crime  rates  are  high‐
est.”
  Many  different  data  sets  from  various  kinds  of  sources 
11
are summarized as follows by the leading text: 
[T]here  is  no  consistent  significant  positive  association  be‐
tween  gun  ownership  levels  and  violence  rates:  across  (1) 
time  within  the  United  States,  (2)  U.S.  cities,  (3)  counties 
within  Illinois,  (4)  country‐sized  areas  like  England,  U.S. 
states,  (5)  regions  of  the  United  States,  (6)  nations,  or  (7) 
12
population subgroups . . . .
 
A second misconception about the relationship between fire‐
arms  and  violence  attributes  Europe’s  generally  low  homicide 
                                                                                                                   
10. J
L
M
,
G
V
:
T
E
E
  204 
OYCE 
EE 
ALCOLM
 
UNS  AND 
IOLENCE
 
HE 
NGLISH 
XPERIENCE
(2002). 
11. Hans  Toch  &  Alan  J.  Lizotte,  Research  and  Policy:  The  Case  for  Gun  Control,  in 
P
&
S
P
  223,  232  (Peter  Suedfeld  &  Philip  E.  Tetlock  eds., 
SYCHOLOGY 
 
OCIAL 
OLICY
1992); see also id. at 234 & n.10 (“[T]he fact that national patterns show little violent 
crime where guns are most dense implies that guns do not elicit aggression in any 
meaningful way. . . . Quite the contrary, these findings suggest that high saturations 
of guns in places, or something correlated with that condition, inhibit illegal aggres‐
sion.”). 
Approaching  the  matter  from  a  different  direction,  the  earliest  data  (nineteenth 
century on) reveals that the American jurisdictions with the most stringent gun con‐
trols  are  in  general  the  ones  with  the  highest  murder  rates.  Conversely,  American 
states  with  homicide  rates  as  low  as  Western  Europe’s  have  high  gun  ownership, 
and impose no  controls designed to deny guns to law‐abiding, responsible adults. 
Many  possible  reasons  may  be  offered  for  these  two  facts,  but  none  suggests  that 
gun control reduces murder. 
  F or examination of a wide variety of studies finding little evidence in support of 
the  efficacy  of  gun  controls  in  reducing  violence,  see  J
B.
J
,  C
G
AMES 
 
ACOBS
AN 
UN 
C
W
?  111–20  (2002);  K
,  supra  note  8,  at  351–77;  J
R.
L
,  J
.,
ONTROL 
ORK
LECK
OHN 
 
OTT
R
 
M
G
,
L
C
:
U
C
G
C
L
 19–20 
ORE 
UNS
 
ESS 
RIME
 
NDERSTANDING 
RIME AND 
UN 
ONTROL 
AWS
(1998); J
D.
W
., U
G
:
W
,
C
V
AMES 
 
RIGHT ET AL
NDER THE 
UN
 
EAPONS
 
RIME AND 
IOLENCE 
A
307–08  (1983);
Matthew  R.  DeZee,  Gun  Control  Legislation:  Impact  and 
IN 
MERICA 
 
Ideology, 5 L
&
P
Q. 367, 369–71 (1983). 
AW 
 
OL
12. K
, supra note 8, at 22‐23. 
LECK

Download Would Banning Firearms Reduce Murder and Suicide? a Review of International Evidence - Don B. Kates, Gary Mauser

38 times
Rate
5(5 / 5) 1 votes
ADVERTISEMENT