"Domestic Violence National Statistics - National Coalition Against Domestic Violence"

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Domestic Violence
National Statistics
WHAT IS DOMESTIC VIOLENCE?
Domestic violence is the willful intimidation, physical assault, battery, sexual assault, and/or other abusive
behavior as part of a systematic pattern of power and control perpetrated by one intimate partner against
another. It includes physical violence, sexual violence, threats, and emotional or psychological abuse. The
frequency and severity of domestic violence varies dramatically.
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND ITS EFFECTS:
WHY IT MATTERS:
• Every 9 seconds in the US a woman is assaulted
Domestic violence is prevalent in every community
or beaten.
and affects all people regardless of age, socio-
i
• In the United States, an average of 20 people are
economic status, sexual orientation, gender, race,
physically abused by intimate partners every min-
religion, or nationality. Physical violence is often ac-
ute. This equates to more than 10 million abuse
companied by emotionally abusive and controlling
victims annually.
behavior as part of a much larger, systematic pat-
ii
• 1 in 3 women and 1 in 4 men have been physi-
tern of dominance and control. Domestic violence
cally abused by an intimate partner.
can result in physical injury, psychological trauma,
iii
• 1 in 5 women and 1 in 7 men have been severely
and even death. The devastating consequences of
physically abused by an intimate partner.
domestic violence can cross generations and last
iv
• 1 in 7 women and 1 in 18 men have been
a lifetime.
stalked. Stalking causes the target to fear she/he
or someone close to her/him will be harmed or
ECONOMIC EFFECTS:
killed.
v
• On a typical day, domestic violence hotlines na-
• Victims of domestic violence lose a total of 8
tionwide receive approximately 20,800 calls.
vi
million days of paid work each year.
xiii
• The presence of a gun in a domestic violence
• The cost of domestic violence exceeds $8.3
situation increases the risk of homicide by 500%.
vii
billion annually.
xiv
• Domestic violence accounts for 15% of all violent
• Between 21-60% of victims of domestic vio-
crime.
viii
lence lose their jobs due to reasons stemming
• Domestic violence is most common among
from the abuse.
xv
women between the ages of 18-24.
ix
• Between 2003 and 2008, 142 women were
• 19% of domestic violence involves a weapon.
x
murdered in their workplace by former or cur-
• Domestic victimization is correlated with a higher
rent intimate partners. This amounts to 22% of
rate of depression and suicidal behavior.
xi
workplace homicides among women.
xvi
• Only 34% of people who are injured by intimate
partners receive medical care for their injuries.
xii
If you need help:
Call The National Domestic Violence Hotline 1-800-799-SAFE (7233)
Or, online go to DomesticShelters.org
Suggested citation: NCADV. (2015). Domestic violence national statistics. Retrieved from www.ncadv.org
Domestic Violence
National Statistics
WHAT IS DOMESTIC VIOLENCE?
Domestic violence is the willful intimidation, physical assault, battery, sexual assault, and/or other abusive
behavior as part of a systematic pattern of power and control perpetrated by one intimate partner against
another. It includes physical violence, sexual violence, threats, and emotional or psychological abuse. The
frequency and severity of domestic violence varies dramatically.
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND ITS EFFECTS:
WHY IT MATTERS:
• Every 9 seconds in the US a woman is assaulted
Domestic violence is prevalent in every community
or beaten.
and affects all people regardless of age, socio-
i
• In the United States, an average of 20 people are
economic status, sexual orientation, gender, race,
physically abused by intimate partners every min-
religion, or nationality. Physical violence is often ac-
ute. This equates to more than 10 million abuse
companied by emotionally abusive and controlling
victims annually.
behavior as part of a much larger, systematic pat-
ii
• 1 in 3 women and 1 in 4 men have been physi-
tern of dominance and control. Domestic violence
cally abused by an intimate partner.
can result in physical injury, psychological trauma,
iii
• 1 in 5 women and 1 in 7 men have been severely
and even death. The devastating consequences of
physically abused by an intimate partner.
domestic violence can cross generations and last
iv
• 1 in 7 women and 1 in 18 men have been
a lifetime.
stalked. Stalking causes the target to fear she/he
or someone close to her/him will be harmed or
ECONOMIC EFFECTS:
killed.
v
• On a typical day, domestic violence hotlines na-
• Victims of domestic violence lose a total of 8
tionwide receive approximately 20,800 calls.
vi
million days of paid work each year.
xiii
• The presence of a gun in a domestic violence
• The cost of domestic violence exceeds $8.3
situation increases the risk of homicide by 500%.
vii
billion annually.
xiv
• Domestic violence accounts for 15% of all violent
• Between 21-60% of victims of domestic vio-
crime.
viii
lence lose their jobs due to reasons stemming
• Domestic violence is most common among
from the abuse.
xv
women between the ages of 18-24.
ix
• Between 2003 and 2008, 142 women were
• 19% of domestic violence involves a weapon.
x
murdered in their workplace by former or cur-
• Domestic victimization is correlated with a higher
rent intimate partners. This amounts to 22% of
rate of depression and suicidal behavior.
xi
workplace homicides among women.
xvi
• Only 34% of people who are injured by intimate
partners receive medical care for their injuries.
xii
If you need help:
Call The National Domestic Violence Hotline 1-800-799-SAFE (7233)
Or, online go to DomesticShelters.org
Suggested citation: NCADV. (2015). Domestic violence national statistics. Retrieved from www.ncadv.org
Domestic Violence
National Statistics
WHY DO PEOPLE STAY IN ABUSIVE RELATIONSHIPS?
One of the most common questions people ask about victims of domestic violence is, “Why don’t they just
leave?” People stay in abusive relationships for a variety of reasons including:
• The victim fears the abuser’s violent behavior will escalate if (s)he tries to leave.
• The abuser has threatened to kill the victim, the victim’s family, friends, pets, children and/or himself/her-
self.
• The victim loves his/her abuser and believes (s)he will change.
• The victim believes abuse is a normal part of a relationship.
• The victim is financially dependent on the abuser.
• The abuser has threatened to take the victim’s children away if (s)he leaves.
• The victim wants her/his children to have two parents.
• The victim’s religious and/or cultural beliefs preclude him/her from leaving.
• The victim has low self-esteem and believes (s)he is to blame for the abuse.
• The victim is embarrassed to let others know (s)he has been abused.
• The victim has nowhere to go if (s)he leaves.
• The victim fears retribution from the abuser’s friends and/or family.
• For more information, visit www.ncadv.org.
Sources:
Bachman, R. & Saltzman, E. (1995). Violence against women: Estimates from the redesigned survey. Retrieved from http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/FEM-
i
VIED.PDF
Black, M.C., Basile, K.C., Breiding, M.J., Smith, S.G., Walters, M.L., Merrick, M.T., Chen, J. & Stevens, M. (2011). The national intimate partner and sexual vio-
ii
lence survey: 2010 summary report. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/nisvs_report2010-a.pdf.
Ibid.
iii
Ibid.
iv
Ibid.
v
National Network to End Domestic Violence (2015). ’14 domestic violence counts national summary. Retrieved from http://nnedv.org/downloads/Census/DV-
vi
Counts2014/DVCounts14_NatlSummary_Color-2.pdf.
Campbell, J.C., Webster, D., Koziol-McLain, J., Block, C., Campbell, D., Curry, M. A., Gary, F., Glass, N., McFarlane, J., Sachs, C., Sharps, P., Ulrich, Y., Wilt,
vii
S., Manganello, J., Xu, X., Schollenberger, J., Frye, V. & Lauphon, K. (2003). Risk factors for femicide in abusive relationships: Results from a multisite case control
study. American Journal of Public Health, 93(7), 1089-1097.
Truman, J. L. & Morgan, R. E. (2014). Nonfatal domestic violence, 2003-2012. Retrieved from http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/ndv0312.pdf.
viii
Ibid.
ix
Ibid.
x
Ibid.
xi
Truman, J. L. & Morgan, R. E. (2014). Nonfatal domestic violence, 2003-2012. Retrieved from http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/ndv0312.pdf.
xii
Rothman, E., Hathaway, J., Stidsen, A. & de Vries, H. (2007). How employment helps female victims of intimate partner abuse: A qualitative study. Journal of Oc-
xiii
cupational Health Psychology, 12(2), 136-143. doi: 10.1037/1076-8998.12.2.136.
Ibid.
xiv
Ibid.
xv
Finkelhor, D., Turner, H., Ormrod, R. & Hamby, S. (2011). Children’s exposure to intimate partner violence and other family violence. Retrieved from https://www.
xvi
ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/232272.pdf.
If you need help:
Call The National Domestic Violence Hotline 1-800-799-SAFE (7233)
Or, online go to DomesticShelters.org
Suggested citation: NCADV. (2015). Domestic violence national statistics. Retrieved from www.ncadv.org
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