"Summary of Performance (Sop)" - Kansas

Summary of Performance (Sop) is a legal document that was released by the Kansas Department of Education - a government authority operating within Kansas.

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SUMMARY OF PERFORMANCE (SOP)
Guidance for Developing the SOP
Purpose
The Summary of Performance (SOP) is required under the reauthorization of the Individuals
with Disabilities Education Act of 2004. The language as stated in IDEA 2004 regarding the
SOP is as follows
For a child whose eligibility under special education terminates due to
graduation with a regular diploma, or due to exceeding the age of eligibility, the
local education agency “shall provide the child with a summary of the child’s
academic achievement and functional performance, which shall include
recommendations on how to assist the child in meeting the child’s postsecondary
goals” §Sec. 300.305(e)(3).
The Summary of Performance, with the accompanying documentation, is important to assist the
student in the transition from high school to higher education, training and/or employment. This
information is necessary under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with
Disabilities Act to help establish a student’s eligibility for reasonable accommodations and
supports in postsecondary settings. It is also useful for the Vocational Rehabilitation
Comprehensive Assessment process. The information about students' current level of
functioning is intended to help postsecondary institutions consider accommodations for access.
These recommendations should not imply that any individual who qualified for special education
in high school will automatically qualify for services in the postsecondary education or the
employment setting. Postsecondary settings will continue to make eligibility decisions on a
case-by-case basis.
The SOP is most useful when linked with the IEP process and the student has the opportunity
to actively participate in the development of this document. During the high school years the
student will work on ways to address gaps between skill levels and the chosen career path or
specific job. Many of these gaps will be addressed through instruction, work experiences, and
accommodations. The SOP needs to articulate the degree to which these gaps still exist
for the student upon exiting from high school and the accommodations that narrow or
close the gaps.
The SOP must be completed during the final year of a student’s high school education.
However, the SOP may be part of a portfolio process that begins at age 14 or before. The timing
of completion of the SOP may vary depending on the student’s postsecondary goals. If a
student is transitioning to higher education, the SOP, with additional documentation, may be
necessary as the student applies to a college or university. Likewise, this information may be
necessary as a student applies for services from state agencies such as vocational
rehabilitation. In some instances, it may be most appropriate to wait until the spring of a
student’s final year to provide an agency or employer the most updated information on the
performance of the student.
= legal requirement to be included in the SOP
KSDE June 2009
Page 1
SUMMARY OF PERFORMANCE (SOP)
Guidance for Developing the SOP
Purpose
The Summary of Performance (SOP) is required under the reauthorization of the Individuals
with Disabilities Education Act of 2004. The language as stated in IDEA 2004 regarding the
SOP is as follows
For a child whose eligibility under special education terminates due to
graduation with a regular diploma, or due to exceeding the age of eligibility, the
local education agency “shall provide the child with a summary of the child’s
academic achievement and functional performance, which shall include
recommendations on how to assist the child in meeting the child’s postsecondary
goals” §Sec. 300.305(e)(3).
The Summary of Performance, with the accompanying documentation, is important to assist the
student in the transition from high school to higher education, training and/or employment. This
information is necessary under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with
Disabilities Act to help establish a student’s eligibility for reasonable accommodations and
supports in postsecondary settings. It is also useful for the Vocational Rehabilitation
Comprehensive Assessment process. The information about students' current level of
functioning is intended to help postsecondary institutions consider accommodations for access.
These recommendations should not imply that any individual who qualified for special education
in high school will automatically qualify for services in the postsecondary education or the
employment setting. Postsecondary settings will continue to make eligibility decisions on a
case-by-case basis.
The SOP is most useful when linked with the IEP process and the student has the opportunity
to actively participate in the development of this document. During the high school years the
student will work on ways to address gaps between skill levels and the chosen career path or
specific job. Many of these gaps will be addressed through instruction, work experiences, and
accommodations. The SOP needs to articulate the degree to which these gaps still exist
for the student upon exiting from high school and the accommodations that narrow or
close the gaps.
The SOP must be completed during the final year of a student’s high school education.
However, the SOP may be part of a portfolio process that begins at age 14 or before. The timing
of completion of the SOP may vary depending on the student’s postsecondary goals. If a
student is transitioning to higher education, the SOP, with additional documentation, may be
necessary as the student applies to a college or university. Likewise, this information may be
necessary as a student applies for services from state agencies such as vocational
rehabilitation. In some instances, it may be most appropriate to wait until the spring of a
student’s final year to provide an agency or employer the most updated information on the
performance of the student.
= legal requirement to be included in the SOP
KSDE June 2009
Page 1
Part 1: Student Information
This section contains student contact and demographic information that will be helpful to future
service providers and to post-school surveyors who will contact students after graduation. A
school contact person is also listed. Complete and up-to-date information is crucial to the follow-
up process.
The completion of the Summary of Performance may require the input from a number of school
personnel including the special education teacher, regular education teacher, school
psychologist or related services personnel.
Part 2: Student’s Measurable Postsecondary Goals and Recommendations to Assist the
Student in Meeting his/her Postsecondary Goals:
Students aged 14 and above (or younger, when deemed appropriate by the IEP team) have
measurable postsecondary goals (based upon age appropriate transition assessments) related
to education or training, employment, and where appropriate, independent living skills.
These goals are the desired postsecondary outcomes of the student. This section should be
completed using information from the student’s recent transition IEP as well as updated
information provided by the student. The information may be filled out independently by the
student or completed with the student through an interview.
Recommendations to assist the student in meeting postsecondary goals – This
section should present suggestions for accommodations, adaptive devices, assistive services,
compensatory strategies, and/or collateral support services, to enhance access in a post-high
school environment, including higher education, training, employment, independent living and/or
community participation. The recommendations can relate to the student’s educational goals,
community participation, employment, and/or independent living. Words of caution when filling
out this section, employers and colleges have different expectations and obligations. Do not
recommend things in the SOP that colleges and employers aren’t required to provide. Post-
secondary providers will continue to make eligibility decisions on a case by case basis and the
recommendations do not imply that the service a student qualified for in high school would
automatically be the rule in post-secondary services.
Part 3:
Academic Achievement and Functional Performance
The Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance section of the IEP
offers a chance to integrate data to provide a current picture of the student’s strengths and
needs. This section includes academic and functional levels of performance. Next to each
specified area, please complete the student’s present level of performance, for example, grade
level, standard scores, strengths and needs, and the accommodations, modifications and
assistive technology that were essential in high school to assist the student in achieving
progress and why they are needed. Please leave blank any section that is not applicable.
Academic Achievement – This should include reading, math, writing, and other
related academic skills. What are the student’s present levels? Include: strengths, needs,
necessary accommodations, modifications, assistive technology, etc. Multiple sources of
assessment data must be considered to develop a complete picture of a student’s academic
ability, such as CBM, district or state assessments, teacher made assessments or standardized
assessments. For a student with significant needs, this information should reflect his or her
KSDE June 2009
Page 2
performance on functional academic tasks, which may include recognition of safety signs for
reading, next-dollar strategy for math, and production of a signature for written language.
Remember that the purpose of the document is to help the next service provider to better
understand how to help the student. What do you think is the most relevant information
to convey? How does the student’s disability affect his/her performance in academic
activities?
Functional Performance – This could include present levels for general ability,
problem solving skills, attention, organization, communication, social skills, behaviors,
independent living skills, self-advocacy skills, career/vocational skills/experience, and
any additional functional information that relates to the student’s measurable
postsecondary goals. How does the student’s disability affect their performance in daily
activities?
The functional area of social skills and behavior should include data-based statements about
the student’s adaptive and problematic behaviors, including information from standardized tests,
and data based on direct observations of the student. Scores on any formal social skills
curriculum the student participated in.
The area of independent living skills includes self-care, leisure skills, personal safety,
transportation, banking, and budgeting. Information for this area will come from evaluation data
or anecdotal information provided by the student, and by service providers who have supported
the student if life skills instruction or supervised the student in living experiences.
The area of environmental access/mobility addresses students with physical challenges.
Information could come from recent assistive technology assessments in school and at work,
anecdotal data from observations, feedback from employer, etc. Develop a statement
highlighting the ideal physical access environment for living, school, and work.
The area of self-determination and self-advocacy is a key component for successful
transition. This is the ability to identify and articulate postsecondary goals, learning strengths
and needs; independence and ability to ask for assistance with meeting needs. Data can be
collected through formal assessments and/or demonstration of skills through student led IEPs
and student presentation of information to employers, etc.
In the area of career/vocational/transition/employment it may be helpful to begin with a brief
summary of information about the student’s career interests, work values, and temperaments
that can be gleaned by reviewing results from career and transition assessments. Include
career development milestones, such as career exploration, work history, job shadowing, or
internships, etc.; courses that targeted the development of career and vocational skills. How do
the student’s experiences, skills and assessment results relate to the post-school outcomes?
Part 4: OPTIONAL
A description of the student’s disability and the assessments used to diagnose the disability will
be helpful to the next provider and may eliminate the need for additional assessments to confirm
the diagnoses for eligibility determination for services.
Information about the student’s experiences in school, the community and work will be helpful to
determine the student’s capabilities, skills and needs.
KSDE June 2009
Page 3
Criteria for Content in the Summary of Performance
1. Information facilitates the transfer of critical information that leads to effective and successful
participation in all postsecondary settings/domains: work, education, community, and home.
2. Information incorporates achievements and up-to-date academic, personal, career, and employment
levels of performance.
3. Student goals are included and are provided as much as possible in the student’s own language or
terms (so that he or she will recognize and remember) and are based on current or recent assessment
findings.
4. Information is based on direct, firsthand input from the student and other transition team members and
stakeholders: teachers, parents, siblings, adult service providers, etc.
5. Data and information, including disabilities, are written in functional terms rather than school system
jargon.
6. Accommodations are presented in functional terms, preferably in the student’s own language
7. Content includes information specifically requested by (or which typically is required or used by) the
student, adult service providers, postsecondary education and training personnel.
8. Information is written and/or presented (in some cases, it could include photographs or illustrations) in
ways that are easily understood and are immediately useful for students, adult service providers,
postsecondary education personnel, and/or employers.
9. Artifacts, documentation, and other items that are attached are identified within the SOP content,
preferably in a highly visible space.
10. Signatures by the student and other team members verify that the contents have been explained and
agreed upon.
11. Information presents an accurate depiction of the student, even if additional space is needed—the
form should fit the student, not the other way around.
(Leconte, P.J. (2006). The evolution of career, vocational, and transition assessment: Implications for the
Summary of Performance. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals. Vol. 29, Number 2, Fall
2006, pp. 114-124.)
KSDE June 2009
Page 4
My Summary of Performance
Name: _______________________________________________________________ Date of Birth: ______________________
Address:________________________________________________________________________________________________
(Street)
(Town, state)
(Zip code)
Telephone Number:_____________________________________________ Year of Graduation/Exit: _____________________
Current School: ____________________________________ City: __________________________________________________
Primary Language or mode of communication: _________________________________________________________________
School Representative Contact: Name: _____________________________________ Title: _____________________________
School: _______________________________ E-mail: _________________________ Telephone Number: _________________
My Goals for one year after high school:
Learning
Goal:
Recommendations to assist me in meeting my goal:
Working
Goal:
Recommendations to assist me in meeting my goal:
Living
Goal:
Recommendations to assist me in meeting my goal:
KSDE June 2009
Page 1
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