"Emergency Action Plan Template"

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Download "Emergency Action Plan Template"

254 times
Rate (4.3 / 5) 16 votes
Emergency Action Plans
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires
companies to develop emergency action plans when a specific OSHA
standard requires their development using the guidelines found in 29 CFR
1926.35. Standards that include references to emergency action plans
include 29 CFR 1926.64 relating to highly hazardous chemical storage,
manufacturing, handling or movement of toxic, reactive, flammable or
explosive chemicals and Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency
Response (HAZWOPER) requirements under 29 CFR 1926.65—operations
involving cleanup, emergency response and corrective actions involving
hazardous wastes.
According to the standard, if a company employs fewer than 11 people, the
program does not have to be in written form; however, many general
contractors and building owners require a written emergency action plan,
regardless of company size or applicability of OSHA standards.
This chapter outlines what is required by the OSHA standard, including the
elements of an emergency action plan and training requirements. The end of
this chapter contains a sample plan that can be used to help shape a
company’s individual plan.
Action Plan Elements
OSHA requires that the information listed below be included in an action
plan. Some of the elements can be generic while others need to be site-
specific. The italicized portions describe the issues a contractor needs to
consider when developing the action plan.
 Emergency evacuation plans, which include escape procedures and
escape route assignments. This needs to be addressed on a project-
by-project basis because there can be no generic plan for escape
routes with the variety of roofing locations and layouts. For example,
an emergency evacuation plan for a high-rise office building will differ
greatly from one for a residential dwelling.
 Procedures to be followed by employees who remain to operate
critical plant operations before evacuation. This procedure is intended
to shut down critical operations that may make a situation even more
hazardous. This may be a consideration for hot bitumen or similar
applications because propane tanks are involved. There may be a
need to shut down propane tanks at the cylinder before evacuating
the site. Electrical tools can ignite a fire if a fuel, such as gasoline, is
spilled. Again, this will need to be addressed on a project-by-project
basis.
Emergency Action Plans
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires
companies to develop emergency action plans when a specific OSHA
standard requires their development using the guidelines found in 29 CFR
1926.35. Standards that include references to emergency action plans
include 29 CFR 1926.64 relating to highly hazardous chemical storage,
manufacturing, handling or movement of toxic, reactive, flammable or
explosive chemicals and Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency
Response (HAZWOPER) requirements under 29 CFR 1926.65—operations
involving cleanup, emergency response and corrective actions involving
hazardous wastes.
According to the standard, if a company employs fewer than 11 people, the
program does not have to be in written form; however, many general
contractors and building owners require a written emergency action plan,
regardless of company size or applicability of OSHA standards.
This chapter outlines what is required by the OSHA standard, including the
elements of an emergency action plan and training requirements. The end of
this chapter contains a sample plan that can be used to help shape a
company’s individual plan.
Action Plan Elements
OSHA requires that the information listed below be included in an action
plan. Some of the elements can be generic while others need to be site-
specific. The italicized portions describe the issues a contractor needs to
consider when developing the action plan.
 Emergency evacuation plans, which include escape procedures and
escape route assignments. This needs to be addressed on a project-
by-project basis because there can be no generic plan for escape
routes with the variety of roofing locations and layouts. For example,
an emergency evacuation plan for a high-rise office building will differ
greatly from one for a residential dwelling.
 Procedures to be followed by employees who remain to operate
critical plant operations before evacuation. This procedure is intended
to shut down critical operations that may make a situation even more
hazardous. This may be a consideration for hot bitumen or similar
applications because propane tanks are involved. There may be a
need to shut down propane tanks at the cylinder before evacuating
the site. Electrical tools can ignite a fire if a fuel, such as gasoline, is
spilled. Again, this will need to be addressed on a project-by-project
basis.
 Procedures to account for all employees after emergency evacuation
has been completed. This is easy for a company to address in a
generic plan. It only needs to state exactly how foremen or site
supervisors will account for all employees. The location and manner
of accounting for employees will vary by site and, therefore, need to
be addressed for each job.
 Rescue and medical duties for those employees who are to perform
them. If rescue and medical duties have been assigned, that
information should be indicated in this section. If a company has
decided to rely on paramedics or other outside medical services, that
should be indicated, as well.
 The preferred means of reporting fires and other emergencies. OSHA
is looking for the method, such as an air horn, that will be used to
alert employees to evacuate. A human voice is an acceptable means
for alerting employees if there are fewer than 11 employees present.
 Names or regular job titles of people or departments who can be
contacted for further information or explanation of duties under the
plan
Alarm System
In 29 CFR 1926.35, another standard, 29 CFR 1926.159, is referenced,
requiring employee alarm systems to comply with the following when there
are 11 or more employees on site:
 Any alarm system must be loud enough to be understood as an alarm
above surrounding noise conditions.
 It must be distinctive enough to result in evacuation.
 If electronic or electrical equipment is used, it must be tested
periodically for reliability.
If a general contractor needs a subcontractor’s company to fulfill the alarm
obligations of emergency action plans, an air horn usually will suffice.
There is no section 29 CFR 1926.159 in the Code of Federal Regulations,
but the alarm system requirements should comply with those set out in 29
CFR 1910.165. In an effort to eliminate duplicative standards, a Federal
Register notice was published on June 30, 1993, indicating that 29 CFR
1926.156, 157, 158 and 159 were eliminated and the requirements of 29
CFR 1910.160, 162, 164 and 165 were to be followed. The requirements of
29 CFR 1910.160, 162, 164 and 165 are exactly the same as those from 29
CFR 1926.156, 157, 158 and 159. Although 29 CFR 1926 does not have the
29 CFR 1910 sections referenced, contractors still are obligated to follow the
requirements of 29 CFR 1910. This is because of an error on OSHA’s part;
the reference to 29 CFR 1910 was inadvertently left out of the 29 CFR 1926
standards.
Training
A company should present its emergency action plan to employees as soon as it is
completed and, thereafter, when designated actions or employee responsibilities change or
the plan changes.
Sample Emergency Action
Plan
Although [company name] takes precautions to prevent them, emergencies
do occur. When they do, they require quick, correct and decisive responses.
Employees have been informed of the company’s planned response to
emergency situations, and they are expected to adhere to these guidelines
for the duration of this project.
The elements of this plan, as required by 29 CFR 1926.35, are as follows:
I.
Emergency evacuation plan
II.
Critical operations
III. Methods to account for [company name] employees
IV. Rescue and medical duties
V.
Means of reporting emergencies
VI. Company representative(s) responsible for plan
I. Emergency Evacuation Plan
On a typical roofing project, [company name] will prepare an
emergency evacuation plan for two areas: the roof and ground.
Roof evacuation procedures are as follows: __________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Ground evacuation procedures are as follows: ________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
II. Critical Operations
If any emergency occurs on a project involving propane, flammable or
combustible liquids, combustion engine equipment or electrical tools,
[company name] employees will shut off propane sources at the
cylinders and turn off all equipment before evacuating, provided
employee safety is not jeopardized by doing so.
Does this project involve the use of propane?
Yes _____ No _____
Does this project involve flammable or combustible
liquids?
Yes _____ No _____
Does this project involve the use of combustion engine
equipment?
Yes _____No _____
Does this project involve the use of electrical tools or
other ignition sources?
Yes _____No _____
Does this project involve the use of other critical operations
or materials not listed?
Yes _____No _____
Explain: _______________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
If our employees are not able to shut off propane supplies, the fire
department or other responding emergency agency will be notified of
the presence and locations of the propane tanks.
List locations of propane on this site: ________________________________________
III. Methods to Account for [Company Name’s]
Employees
Employees have been instructed to meet at a designated location so
they can be accounted for on the project. If it is determined that any
employees are missing, the responding emergency agency will be
notified. The agency also will be informed about the last approximate
whereabouts of missing employees.
The meeting location will be chosen based on the type of emergency
involved. The project manager will account for wind direction and
potential hazards in determining the meeting place.
The meeting location for this project will be: ___________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
IV. Rescue and Medical Duties
This crew has been specifically trained to rescue
and/or attend to injured employees.
Yes _____
No _____
If “No” has been checked, our employees will rely on paramedics or
other emergency rescue teams.
If “Yes” has been checked, those employees trained in
rescue operations will perform duties according to the training
they have received. The remaining employees will meet at the
designated meeting area.
V. Means of Reporting Emergencies
When a fire or emergency occurs, it is our intention to notify all
employees, affected contractors, building owners and homeowners
about the crisis.
The first call will be made to the local fire department by using 911. If
911 is unavailable in the job’s area or there is an onsite fire
department, such as on military installations, that emergency telephone
number will be used instead. Emergency telephone numbers are
included in this plan.
If there are 10 employees or fewer in the area, a human voice will be
used to notify those on the job. For projects involving more than 10
employees, air horns or similar equipment will be used.
VI. Company Representative(s) Responsible for
Plan
The job foreman is the responsible person to contact with any
questions regarding this plan. If additional information is needed, the
project manager should be contacted.
Emergency Contacts
Project Address:
Project Telephone: (
)
Home Office Telephone: (
)