"Template for Automatic Number Plate Recognition (Anpr) Infrastructure Development Privacy Impact Assessment" - United Kingdom

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Template for Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR)
Infrastructure Development Privacy Impact Assessment
This template is provided to support the police service and other law enforcement
agencies (LEA) to comply with their data protection obligations and meet individuals’
expectations of privacy when developing new ANPR infrastructure. It has been
developed to provide a consistent approach to the conduct of privacy impact
assessments and support compliance with the Information Commissioner’s Office
(ICO) Conducting privacy impact assessments code of practice (February 2014).
Black Font: Suggested content to be included in the report
Red Font: Advice/ Guidance to assist completion of the relevant section.
Template for Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR)
Infrastructure Development Privacy Impact Assessment
This template is provided to support the police service and other law enforcement
agencies (LEA) to comply with their data protection obligations and meet individuals’
expectations of privacy when developing new ANPR infrastructure. It has been
developed to provide a consistent approach to the conduct of privacy impact
assessments and support compliance with the Information Commissioner’s Office
(ICO) Conducting privacy impact assessments code of practice (February 2014).
Black Font: Suggested content to be included in the report
Red Font: Advice/ Guidance to assist completion of the relevant section.
Description of proposed ANPR development:
Provide an overview of the proposed ANPR development.
Privacy Impact Assessment completed by:
Date:
Part 1
Screening Questions
1
Will the project involve the collection of new information about
individuals?
Vehicle Registration Marks (VRM) will be obtained from locations not previously
monitored by ANPR and therefore new information will be obtained from those
locations.
2
Will the project compel individuals to provide information about
themselves?
The collection of VRM is automatic at the locations and therefore when an
individual drives a vehicle at the new locations they could be considered as
compelled to provide information. The Surveillance Camera Code describes
overt surveillance in public places in pursuit of a legitimate aim and that meets a
pressing need, as surveillance by consent. Such consent on the part of the
community must be informed consent and not assumed by a system operator.
Subject therefore to compliance with DPA and appropriate consideration of
privacy, individuals can be considered to consent to the provision of information
at the locations as opposed to being compelled to provide the information.
3
Will information about individuals be disclosed to organisations or people
who have not previously had routine access to the information?
Whilst information from new locations will be disclosed it will only be disclosed
to those organisations that currently have access to ANPR data.
4
Are you using information about individuals for a purpose it is not
currently used for, or in a way it is not currently used?
The new ANPR infrastructure will provide ANPR data for the same purposes as
for the data already obtained from ANPR systems. The developments will not
alter the way in which it is used.
5
Does the project involve you using new technology that might be
perceived as being privacy intrusive? For biometrics or facial recognition.
The project does not involve the use of new technology that might be perceived
as privacy intrusive.
6
Will the project result in you making decisions or taking action against
individuals in ways that can have a significant impact on them?
The purpose of the proposed development of infrastructure is in order to detect,
deter, and disrupt criminality and therefore impact significantly on those
involved in such activity.
7
Is the information about individuals of a kind particularly likely to raise
privacy concerns or expectations? For example, health records, criminal
records or other information that people would consider to be private.
ANPR data is personal data since it can be combined with other information by
an LEA to provide data relating to an individual. ANPR data does not however
constitute private information since it is collected overtly in circumstances where
there is no reasonable expectation of privacy. It therefore does not give rise to
significant privacy concerns or expectations.
8
Will the project require you to contact individuals in ways that they may
find intrusive?
There is no requirement to contact individuals.
Part 2
Record of Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Process
Overview of the Proposed Development – Outlining the Pressing Social Need
justifying the development of ANPR Infrastructure
(A key reference document is the Strategic assessment of policing challenges within an area should be structured to
take account information relating to the following categories of strategic threat:
National Security and counter terrorism,
Serious, organised and major crime,
Local crime,
Community confidence and reassurance/ crime prevention and reduction.
It is important that an assessment against these high level categories is supported by evidence and information; a
reference to these categories, in isolation, is unlikely to be sufficient to support the identification of a pressing social
need for deployment of ANPR.
Provide a summary from the strategic assessment in this section.
In addition further information is required to establish a pressing social need for that threat to be countered by the
deployment of ANPR. Whilst other factors may also be relevant this element of assessment requires consideration of
the following factors, with appropriate analysis:
The numbers of people that are, or could be affected by the issues identified within the strategic assessment.
Whether those issues could lead to damage, distress or both and if so the nature and severity of those
consequences.
Any local views on the deployment of ANPR.
Any wider societal views on the use of ANPR.
The alternative tactical responses that may be available to meet the challenges that may be less or more
intrusive than ANPR.
How the use of ANPR will assist resolution of the issues identified.
The scope of privacy intrusion – How many people does this affect?
All of the factors considered should be weighed against each other in determining whether it may be appropriate for
ANPR to be deployed. It is essential that a pressing social need is identified for a deployment of new infrastructure or
continue use of existing capability to be justified and for this to then be considered in the context of privacy. )
Provisions for Collection, Use and Deletion of ANPR data.
As a vehicle passes an ANPR camera, its registration number (VRM) is read and
forwarded to a local database where it instantly checked against database records of
vehicles of interest and stored to enable later research. If the number is for a vehicle of
interest (VOI) details can be passed to Police officers who can intercept and stop a
vehicle, check it for evidence and, where necessary, make arrests. In addition to the
„read‟ data images of the number plate (plate patch) and overview of the front of the car
is obtained in most cases and forwarded to the local database.
In addition a copy of the read data together with the plate patch is forwarded to the
National ANPR Data Centre (NADC) where details are also stored to enable later
research. The VRM read by the ANPR camera is also checked against lists of VOI that
have been placed on the NADC by other LEA. If the VRM is matched against any of
those lists then the LEA submitting the list is also provided with details of the VRM read
together with the time and location of the read.
Data held both locally and on the NADC may be researched for investigation purposes
within clear rules described within National ANPR Standards for Policing (NASP). NASP
also includes requirements for audit of access to data.
These rules include „user defined‟ permissions to access data based upon a person‟s
role and requirements for prior authorisation of searches based on the type of
investigation being undertaken and the length of time that has passed since the
collection of data.
Rules and procedures are in place to ensure compliance with the data access and audit
requirements of NASP.
ANPR data is retained both locally and nationally for a period of 2 years before it is
deleted.
Consultation Requirements
Internal:
(can include informal discussions and e-mails. Project management meetings and discussion on agenda of other
regular meetings)
Project team
Data Protection/ Information compliance officer
– can provide specialist knowledge on privacy issues.
Information technology – can advise on security risks that may impact on security
ANPR Manager
– can advise on specialist aspects of ANPR systems
Communications
– PIA can assist in resolution of privacy concerns by providing clear information about a project
and capability.
External:
The scope of external consultation should be assessed in the context of the development that is proposed. There are 2
main aims from external consultation. Firstly to enable understanding of the concerns of external stakeholders and
secondly to improve transparency by making people aware of how ANPR is used.
The extent of consultation should be determined in relation to the assessment of the privacy related risks in the context
of the location, the transient and resident populations. In most cases existing communication and consultation
mechanisms within an LEA will be appropriate. These include all existing focus and advisory groups that support
public engagement provide. The ICO Code indicates that “where possible, existing consultation tools should be used
to gain a better understanding of privacy expectations and experiences.” It is only in the largest planned developments
that an alternative, more extensive approach may be required.
A record should be maintained of the consultation process.