"Aosc 200: Weather and Climate Discussion Worksheet 2 With Answer Key - Timothy Canty, University of Maryland"

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Download "Aosc 200: Weather and Climate Discussion Worksheet 2 With Answer Key - Timothy Canty, University of Maryland"

224 times
Rate (4.7 / 5) 11 votes
AOSC 200: Weather and Climate Discussion 
Worksheet 2 Answers 
 
1. Define saturation of air. 
A state of the atmosphere where the level of water vapor is the maximum possible at the existing 
temperature and pressure. 
 
2. Define saturation vapor pressure. 
The maximum amount of water vapor necessary to keep moist air in equilibrium with a surface of 
pure water or ice. 
 
3. Explain the concept of saturation in terms of molecules at the surface of a liquid. 
Energetic molecules at the surface of a liquid occasionally escape as vapor molecules (evaporation). 
Some molecules then condense back into liquid once the air is saturated (“full” of water molecules). In 
other words, saturation is when the number of water molecules evaporating into the air is equal to the 
number of molecules condensing into the liquid. 
 
4. Define dew point. 
The temperature to which air must be cooled for saturation to occur (at constant pressure and water 
vapor content) 
 
5. Describe the conditions necessary for the formation of radiation fog. 
Radiation fog is produced by Earth’s radiative cooling. 
i. Forms best on clear nights when a shallow layer of moist air near the ground is overlain by drier air 
ii. The ground does not cool rapidly since the shallow, moist layer does not absorb much of the 
earth’s outgoing Infrared radiation. 
iii. As the ground cools, so does the air directly above it, and a surface inversion forms, with colder air 
at the surface and warmer air above. 
iv. The moist, warm layer (chilled by the cold ground) quickly becomes saturated, and fog forms. 
v. The longer the night, the longer time of cooling and greater likelihood of fog. 
vi. Most common over land in late fall/winter. 
 
6. Describe the conditions necessary for the formation advection fog. 
i. Warm, moist air moves over a sufficiently colder surface due to winds (advection) 
ii. Moist air cools to its saturation point 
iii. Mostly forms over land when warm, moist air from above the ocean moves onto land. 
 
Main difference: Radiation fog under calm conditions; advection fog when wind blows moist air over a 
cold surface.  
 
7. Why do hot and humid summer days usually feel hotter than hot and dry summer days? 
Evaporation is a cooling process since energy is required to go ​ i nto ​   the molecules to break attractive 
hydrogen bonds between individual water molecules.  
AOSC 200: Weather and Climate Discussion 
Worksheet 2 Answers 
 
1. Define saturation of air. 
A state of the atmosphere where the level of water vapor is the maximum possible at the existing 
temperature and pressure. 
 
2. Define saturation vapor pressure. 
The maximum amount of water vapor necessary to keep moist air in equilibrium with a surface of 
pure water or ice. 
 
3. Explain the concept of saturation in terms of molecules at the surface of a liquid. 
Energetic molecules at the surface of a liquid occasionally escape as vapor molecules (evaporation). 
Some molecules then condense back into liquid once the air is saturated (“full” of water molecules). In 
other words, saturation is when the number of water molecules evaporating into the air is equal to the 
number of molecules condensing into the liquid. 
 
4. Define dew point. 
The temperature to which air must be cooled for saturation to occur (at constant pressure and water 
vapor content) 
 
5. Describe the conditions necessary for the formation of radiation fog. 
Radiation fog is produced by Earth’s radiative cooling. 
i. Forms best on clear nights when a shallow layer of moist air near the ground is overlain by drier air 
ii. The ground does not cool rapidly since the shallow, moist layer does not absorb much of the 
earth’s outgoing Infrared radiation. 
iii. As the ground cools, so does the air directly above it, and a surface inversion forms, with colder air 
at the surface and warmer air above. 
iv. The moist, warm layer (chilled by the cold ground) quickly becomes saturated, and fog forms. 
v. The longer the night, the longer time of cooling and greater likelihood of fog. 
vi. Most common over land in late fall/winter. 
 
6. Describe the conditions necessary for the formation advection fog. 
i. Warm, moist air moves over a sufficiently colder surface due to winds (advection) 
ii. Moist air cools to its saturation point 
iii. Mostly forms over land when warm, moist air from above the ocean moves onto land. 
 
Main difference: Radiation fog under calm conditions; advection fog when wind blows moist air over a 
cold surface.  
 
7. Why do hot and humid summer days usually feel hotter than hot and dry summer days? 
Evaporation is a cooling process since energy is required to go ​ i nto ​   the molecules to break attractive 
hydrogen bonds between individual water molecules.  
When the air is humid (saturated with water vapor or close to saturated), sweat does not readily 
evaporate into the air. This means you stay hot on a hot day. 
When the air is dry (very unsaturated), sweat can quickly evaporate into the air, which takes energy 
to break the bonds and leaves your skin cool. 
 
8. List two primary ways in which fog forms 
By cooling ­ air is cooled below its saturation point (dew point). 
By evaporation and mixing ­ water vapor is added to the air by evaporation, and the moist air mixes 
with relatively dry air. 
 
9. List the four major cloud groups, mid­latitude heights where each group prevails, and the cloud 
types associated with each group. 
High
16000 to 43000 ft
cirrus, cirrostratus, cirrocumulus 
Middle
6500 to 23000 ft
altostratus, altocumulus 
Low
surface to 6500 ft
stratus, stratocumulus, nimbostratus 
Vertically developed
cumulus, cumulonimbus 
 
10. Which cloud is associated with lightning? Which cloud is associated with heavy rain showers? 
Which cloud is associated with light continuous rain or snow? 
Cumulonimbus, cumulonimbus, nimbostratus, in that order. (remember they all have nimbus/nimbo in 
their name, which indicates precipitation​
)  
 
11. Use the concepts of condensation and saturation to explain why eyeglasses often fog up after 
coming indoors on a cold day (or going from inside a cold, air­conditioned room to a muggy, 
humid day outside). 
Glass lenses cool to the surrounding temperature they are in. When you step into a different 
environment, the warmer air comes in contact with the cold glasses and the water vapor in the air 
condenses onto the glasses, creating a fog effect.  
 
12. Explain why icebergs are frequently surrounded by fog. (Apparently, the conditions in which 
the Titanic sank actually did not have any fog due to unusually high pressure that night).  
Icebergs are frozen and very cold, so they have a chilling effect on the surrounding air. (Air cools by 
conduction of heat from air to iceberg). If the air is cooled to the dewpoint temperature, a fog will form 
when condensation takes place. 
 
13. Imagine a chilly November evening where the air temperature during the night cools to the dew 
point, thus producing a thick, wispy fog layer. Before the fog formed, the air temperature 
cooled each hour by 3°F. After the fog formed, the air only cooled by 1°F each hour. Give two 
reasons why the air cooled more slowly after the fog formed. 
1. Water vapor that condenses releases latent heat to the surroundings, thus warming the air slightly. 
2. Fog acts as a blanket to the terrestrial radiation that escapes Earth’s surface, absorbing some of it, 
and emitting some back down. Overall, absorption and emission have a warming effect to the air. 
 
Page of 2