"Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills Assessment Form - Kindergarten"

ADVERTISEMENT
Kindergarten
All students at our school are screened for reading difficulties three times a year using the Dynamic
Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) Next. This is one assessment that helps us identify
students who may need extra help in learning the skills needed to become a strong reader. Your child’s
Fall
Winter
Spring
First Sound Fluency
_______ (10)
_______ (30)
Letter Naming Fluency
_______
_______
_______
Phoneme Segmentation Fluency
_______ (20)
_______ (40)
Nonsense Word Fluency
_______ (17)
_______ (28)
Composite Score
_______ (26)
_______ (122)
_______ (119)
Instructional
Numbers in parentheses indicate expected performance
The results of this assessment indicate:
F
W
S
Your child is on track to becoming a strong reader
Your child may need some extra help with basic reading skills
Teacher Comments:
First Sound Fluency (FSF)
The understanding that words are made up of separate sounds is called “phonemic awareness.” Phonemic awareness is a critical
skill in learning to read. The FSF subtest assesses your child’s ability to isolate the beginning sounds in words. Your child is given a
word and asked to say the first sound in the word (“What is the first sound you hear in the word ‘man’?” Child “/m/”).
Letter Naming Fluency (LNF)
On the LNF assessment, your child is shown a page of random letters and asked to name the letters. The number of letters your
child names correctly in one minute is counted. Although the ability to name letters is a strong predictor of later reading achievement,
studies have demonstrated that it is possible for children to learn letter-sound correspondence without naming letters. Therefore,
naming letters is not a powerful instructional target and benchmark goals are not provided.
Phoneme Segmentation Fluency (PSF)
Understanding that spoken words can be broken down into individual sounds and then blended back together to form a word is an
important skill in learning to read and write. On the PSF assessment, your child is given a spoken word and asked to say each sound
in the word (“Tell me the sounds in the word ‘mop’?” “Child: /m/ /o/ /p/”).
Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF)
Children with strong phonics skills know the sounds of letters and are able to blend them together to form words. On the NWF
assessment, your child is shown a “nonsense word” containing 2 or 3 letters (e.g. bim, ob) and asked to read the word. Your child is
given credit for each correct sound and added credit if he/she reads the word without saying each individual sound. Nonsense words
are used so that the teacher knows your child is connecting the sound to the letter rather than recognizing the word by sight.
Composite Score
The Composite Score is a combination of the assessments and provides the best overall estimate of your child’s reading proficiency.
Visit www.maketaketeach.com for kindergarten reading activities!
Kindergarten
All students at our school are screened for reading difficulties three times a year using the Dynamic
Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) Next. This is one assessment that helps us identify
students who may need extra help in learning the skills needed to become a strong reader. Your child’s
Fall
Winter
Spring
First Sound Fluency
_______ (10)
_______ (30)
Letter Naming Fluency
_______
_______
_______
Phoneme Segmentation Fluency
_______ (20)
_______ (40)
Nonsense Word Fluency
_______ (17)
_______ (28)
Composite Score
_______ (26)
_______ (122)
_______ (119)
Instructional
Numbers in parentheses indicate expected performance
The results of this assessment indicate:
F
W
S
Your child is on track to becoming a strong reader
Your child may need some extra help with basic reading skills
Teacher Comments:
First Sound Fluency (FSF)
The understanding that words are made up of separate sounds is called “phonemic awareness.” Phonemic awareness is a critical
skill in learning to read. The FSF subtest assesses your child’s ability to isolate the beginning sounds in words. Your child is given a
word and asked to say the first sound in the word (“What is the first sound you hear in the word ‘man’?” Child “/m/”).
Letter Naming Fluency (LNF)
On the LNF assessment, your child is shown a page of random letters and asked to name the letters. The number of letters your
child names correctly in one minute is counted. Although the ability to name letters is a strong predictor of later reading achievement,
studies have demonstrated that it is possible for children to learn letter-sound correspondence without naming letters. Therefore,
naming letters is not a powerful instructional target and benchmark goals are not provided.
Phoneme Segmentation Fluency (PSF)
Understanding that spoken words can be broken down into individual sounds and then blended back together to form a word is an
important skill in learning to read and write. On the PSF assessment, your child is given a spoken word and asked to say each sound
in the word (“Tell me the sounds in the word ‘mop’?” “Child: /m/ /o/ /p/”).
Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF)
Children with strong phonics skills know the sounds of letters and are able to blend them together to form words. On the NWF
assessment, your child is shown a “nonsense word” containing 2 or 3 letters (e.g. bim, ob) and asked to read the word. Your child is
given credit for each correct sound and added credit if he/she reads the word without saying each individual sound. Nonsense words
are used so that the teacher knows your child is connecting the sound to the letter rather than recognizing the word by sight.
Composite Score
The Composite Score is a combination of the assessments and provides the best overall estimate of your child’s reading proficiency.
Visit www.maketaketeach.com for kindergarten reading activities!
Core
An instructional recommendation of “core” means that the odds are in your child’s favor of achieving later reading goals
with a continuing effective curriculum and instruction.
Strategic
An instructional recommendation of “strategic” means that the odds of achieving later reading goals are approximately
50% without added instructional support in addition to core reading instruction. If your child’s performance fell within this
category, he/she will likely require intervention in addition to core reading instruction. Small group instruction targeting
specific skills may be required. This intervention may be provided by your child’s classroom teacher and/or a reading
specialist.
Intensive
An instructional recommendation of “intensive” means that your child’s odds of achieving later reading goals are approxi-
mately 10-20% without substantial intervention and support in addition to core reading instruction. Your child will require
small group intensive intervention targeting specific skills. Your child is likely to receive small group intervention both in
the classroom as well as with a reading specialist.
ADVERTISEMENT

Download "Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills Assessment Form - Kindergarten"

302 times
Rate
(4.4 / 5) 21 votes
Page of 2