"Name Juggling Worksheet" - Florida

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Download "Name Juggling Worksheet" - Florida

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Name Juggling
Objectives:
Icebreaker/Warm-ups, Name Games
Group Size:
Small/Medium
Setup:
None
Directions:
Stand in a circle. Go around the circle and have everyone share names, one at
a time. Let participants know that it is OK to ask someone else’s name if you
don’t remember. Start with one object, like a koosh ball. Explain: “I’m going
to start by tossing this ball to someone else in the circle. If you receive it, toss
it to someone else in the circle not immediately on either side of you. That
person will toss it to another person who has not yet received it and again not
immediately on either side of him or her. Throwing continues until the last
person tosses the ball back to me. Remember who you tossed to because we
will try to recreate the pattern in the next phase. Any questions?” This is a
good point to encourage people to wait until the person you call looks you in
the eye to throw the ball. When the person catches the ball, he or she thanks
the person by name who threw the ball and then states a name and throws to a
new person. Set a pattern so that each person in the circle throws and receives
the ball one time. Explain: “Now we are going to try to repeat the process, but
we are going to see how many balls we can keep up in the air at any one time.
Any questions?”. Once any questions have been answered, toss the ball to the
first person. As soon as they toss the ball, grab another one from your stash
and toss it. Repeat until a) there is exactly the number of balls going as there
are participants (an almost Herculean task) or b) the process begins to break
down. Notice how many balls the group has going, and retrieve them as they
come back to you. Inform the group as to how many balls they had in the air
when they were doing their best. Ask the group to consider how they might
improve their performance. Typical modifications allow for participants to
move their position, make agreements as to how they will throw to each other
(e.g., “I’ll toss mine to you high” or “I’ll roll mine across the floor”), agree to
pause the process when one ball goes awry, etc. Begin the process again.
Name Juggling
Objectives:
Icebreaker/Warm-ups, Name Games
Group Size:
Small/Medium
Setup:
None
Directions:
Stand in a circle. Go around the circle and have everyone share names, one at
a time. Let participants know that it is OK to ask someone else’s name if you
don’t remember. Start with one object, like a koosh ball. Explain: “I’m going
to start by tossing this ball to someone else in the circle. If you receive it, toss
it to someone else in the circle not immediately on either side of you. That
person will toss it to another person who has not yet received it and again not
immediately on either side of him or her. Throwing continues until the last
person tosses the ball back to me. Remember who you tossed to because we
will try to recreate the pattern in the next phase. Any questions?” This is a
good point to encourage people to wait until the person you call looks you in
the eye to throw the ball. When the person catches the ball, he or she thanks
the person by name who threw the ball and then states a name and throws to a
new person. Set a pattern so that each person in the circle throws and receives
the ball one time. Explain: “Now we are going to try to repeat the process, but
we are going to see how many balls we can keep up in the air at any one time.
Any questions?”. Once any questions have been answered, toss the ball to the
first person. As soon as they toss the ball, grab another one from your stash
and toss it. Repeat until a) there is exactly the number of balls going as there
are participants (an almost Herculean task) or b) the process begins to break
down. Notice how many balls the group has going, and retrieve them as they
come back to you. Inform the group as to how many balls they had in the air
when they were doing their best. Ask the group to consider how they might
improve their performance. Typical modifications allow for participants to
move their position, make agreements as to how they will throw to each other
(e.g., “I’ll toss mine to you high” or “I’ll roll mine across the floor”), agree to
pause the process when one ball goes awry, etc. Begin the process again.