Form BEA16-07 "Arts and Culture Grows at Faster Pace in 2013 Bea Releases for the First Time Inflation-Adjusted Statistics"

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NEWS RELEASE
RELEASED AT 10 A.M. EST, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2016
Technical: Paul Kern:
(202) 606-9596
BEA 16-07
Media:
Jeannine Aversa:
606-2649
E-mail inquiries:
artsandculture@bea.gov
ARTS AND CULTURE GROWS AT FASTER PACE IN 2013
BEA RELEASES FOR THE FIRST TIME INFLATION-ADJUSTED STATISTICS
Arts and cultural economic activity – adjusted for inflation – grew 2.5 percent in 2013, according to
estimates of the industries’ real value added by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). That compares with a
1.1 percent increase in 2012.
Information services and design services were the leading contributors to the growth in 2013. Overall, 26 of 36
– arts and culture related industries – contributed to the increase. This is the first time that BEA has released
inflation-adjusted statistics that track the changing economic impact of arts and culture.
Core arts and cultural industries, such as performing arts, museums and design services, grew 3.3 percent. Real
value added for supporting industries, including art support services and information services, increased 2.5
percent.
NEWS RELEASE
RELEASED AT 10 A.M. EST, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2016
Technical: Paul Kern:
(202) 606-9596
BEA 16-07
Media:
Jeannine Aversa:
606-2649
E-mail inquiries:
artsandculture@bea.gov
ARTS AND CULTURE GROWS AT FASTER PACE IN 2013
BEA RELEASES FOR THE FIRST TIME INFLATION-ADJUSTED STATISTICS
Arts and cultural economic activity – adjusted for inflation – grew 2.5 percent in 2013, according to
estimates of the industries’ real value added by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). That compares with a
1.1 percent increase in 2012.
Information services and design services were the leading contributors to the growth in 2013. Overall, 26 of 36
– arts and culture related industries – contributed to the increase. This is the first time that BEA has released
inflation-adjusted statistics that track the changing economic impact of arts and culture.
Core arts and cultural industries, such as performing arts, museums and design services, grew 3.3 percent. Real
value added for supporting industries, including art support services and information services, increased 2.5
percent.
Other highlights
 Other information services, which includes Internet publishing, Internet broadcasting and Web search
portals, was the leading contributor to the growth in real value added in 2013. Other information
services increased 21.2 percent, after decreasing 2.0 percent in 2012.
 Construction activity related to arts and culture fell 8.1 percent, following a decline of 26.2 percent.
 Both graphic design and architectural services rebounded, increasing 4.3 percent and 1.7 percent
respectively, after decreasing 13.8 percent and 7.1 percent.
 Performing arts companies also rebounded, increasing 2.2 percent, after decreasing 3.3 percent.
Gross output
In addition to real value added statistics, BEA’s Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account also
includes a measure of real gross output. Under that measure, total inflation-adjusted spending on all arts and
cultural commodities reached $1.1 trillion in 2013. That figure was up 2.7 percent from the year before.
Gross output serves as a proxy for total sales and is not adjusted to exclude expenses incurred in the production
process. For example, gross output for the opera reflects all ticket receipts without subtracting the expenses
incurred in the production of the opera such as advertising, rent and costume rentals.
Other highlights
 Real gross output growth slowed slightly in 2013. It rose 2.7 percent, after increasing 2.8 percent in
2012. Advertising services was the leading contributor to that deceleration, increasing 1.7 percent, after
growing 5.6 percent.
 The category of independent artists, writers and performers was the second-leading contributor to the
deceleration in real gross output in 2013. That category increased 0.6 percent, after a 6.9 percent rise.
 Performing arts output grew at a faster pace in 2013, increasing 3.7 percent, up from 1.2 percent. This
faster growth was widespread, including gains in music, opera and theater.
Employment
Employment for all arts and cultural industries totaled 4.74 million in 2013. Art support services,
including rental and leasing, totaled 1.19 million jobs, the most in all arts and cultural industries. Information
services, including publishing, motion pictures and broadcasting, accounted for 1.17 million jobs and retailers
related to arts and culture totaled 731,200 jobs. Employment for design services was 471,100 – about half of
which is accounted for by advertising and architectural services.
Employment in Selected Arts and Cultural Production Industries in 2013
Broadcasting
Motion Pictures
Publishing
Performing Arts
Advertising
Museums
Architectural Services
Photography Services
Graphic Design Services
Fine Arts Education
0
150,000
300,000
450,000
Employment
U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis
Definitions
ACPSA output. ACPSA output consists of all domestically produced goods and services purchased (for
example, movie tickets or design services).
ACPSA employment. ACPSA employment consists of all jobs where the workers are engaged in the
production of ACPSA output (for example, dancers or architects).
ACPSA value added.
ACPSA value added consists of ACPSA output minus ACPSA intermediate
consumption (for example, costumes rented by a performing arts company or printing of the program for the
show).
BEA’s Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account (ACPSA) is supported by funding from the National
Endowment for the Arts (NEA).
This release of the ACPSA incorporates estimates from the annual revision of BEA’s Industry Economic
1
Accounts.
Before this year, BEA released arts and cultural production statistics in current dollars only (i.e.
2
without inflation adjustment).
Defining ‘Culture’ in the context of Input-Output Tables
for the Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account
Culture can be defined in a variety of ways to include: language, traditions, beliefs and values. For this
account, arts and cultural production is defined narrowly to include creative artistic activity; the goods and
services produced by it; the goods and services produced in the support of it; and the construction of buildings
in which it is taking place.
The Input-Output table is a valuable tool to identify and estimate the value of the ‘creative chain.’ This chain
captures the economic value of the creation of a cultural product (composing a symphony) from its production
(the performance being recorded in a studio), distribution (by various modes), and final consumption (by the
3
listener).
1
For more information, see Thomas F. Howells and Edward T. Morgan, “Industry Economic Accounts: Initial Statistics for the
Second Quarter of 2014, Revised Statistics for 1997–2013.” Survey of Current Business (December 2014).
2
Http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/general/acpsa/acpsa0115.pdf
3
For more information, see Paul V. Kern, David B. Wasshausen, and Steven L. Zemanek, “U.S. Arts and Cultural Production Satellite
Account, 1998-2012.” Survey of Current Business (January 2015).
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