"Backwards Design Lesson Plan Template - Daniel P. Murphy"

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Daniel P. Murphy, Rhode Island School of Design, 2015.
Backwards Design Lesson Plan Template
Title/Topic:
Time:
Section 1 – Identify Desired Results
Learning Outcomes/Objectives: List all desired learning outcomes for your activity. This can include institutional,
departmental, and session-specific outcomes.
Essential Question(s): This is an overarching question that should be answerable as a result of attending the session.
This should not be a yes or no question, but rather an open ended question.
Knowledge: As a result of this session, participants will
Behavior: As a result of this session, participants will be
know…
able to…
Adapted and modified from: Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for
Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Daniel P. Murphy, Rhode Island School of Design, 2015.
Backwards Design Lesson Plan Template
Title/Topic:
Time:
Section 1 – Identify Desired Results
Learning Outcomes/Objectives: List all desired learning outcomes for your activity. This can include institutional,
departmental, and session-specific outcomes.
Essential Question(s): This is an overarching question that should be answerable as a result of attending the session.
This should not be a yes or no question, but rather an open ended question.
Knowledge: As a result of this session, participants will
Behavior: As a result of this session, participants will be
know…
able to…
Adapted and modified from: Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for
Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Daniel P. Murphy, Rhode Island School of Design, 2015.
Section 2 – Determine Acceptable Evidence
Assessment: List how you will assess learning. What performance tasks will participants partake in to demonstrate and
provide evidence of proficiency? How will you, the facilitator, know they’ve learned the material? These should directly
relate to the knowledge, behavior, and learning outcomes.
Pre:
Formative:
Summative:
Differentiation: Consider who your audience is. What theories can you use to guide modifications for different
students in your audience? What accommodations can you provide to those with differing ability levels?
Adapted and modified from: Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for
Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Daniel P. Murphy, Rhode Island School of Design, 2015.
Section 3 – Plan Learning Experiences
Learning Activities: List instructions of how to facilitate this session. Learning activities should relate directly to the
identified desired results and identified acceptable evidence.
Adapted and modified from: Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for
Supervision and Curriculum Development.
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