"Conferring With Students - Conference Log" - Wisconsin

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Information Technology Solutions
Conferring with Students
A
A
BOUT THE
SSESSMENT
CONFERRING involves having a conversation with students about their reading and writing.
Conferring always has a clear purpose and predictable structure. Conferring can be used to
Common Core
inform instruction, monitor student growth, and provide students feedback on their
understanding of the ELA and Literacy CCSS.
State Standards
Strand
I
A
MPLEMENTATION OF THE
SSESSMENT
ELA and Literacy
I N T E R N E T S E C U R I T Y
Establish the purpose of the conference. On which specific area of the ELA and Literacy
CCSS will you be focusing during the conference?
Sit amet, consec tetuer
Establish a system of record keeping during conferences that can be used to inform
adipiscing elit, sed diam
Grade Level
instruction, monitor student growth, and provide feedback to students.
nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt
K-12
Set up the structure of the reading, writing, or speaking and listening conference. Each
ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam.
conference should involve conversations about the following elements:
1. The work the child is doing as a writer, the books the child is reading as a reader, or
N E T W O R K P R O T E C T I O N
the collaborative discussions in which the child is participating.
Purpose
2. How the child can become a better reader, writer, or speaker and listener.
Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam,
Use with students
3. Goal setting and monitoring.
quis nostrud exerci tation
to inform
During the conference the teacher and the student alternate roles.
ullamcorper.Et iusto odio
1. The student begins with the lead role by describing his or her reading, writing, or
instruction,
dignissim qui blandit
collaborative discussions as the teacher listens carefully and asks questions to
monitor student
praeseptatum zzril delenit
deepen the students’ understanding of the work
growth, and
augue duis dolore te feugait
2. The teacher then takes the lead role by questioning the student as they read their
provide students
writing, listen to the student read, or reflect on their participation in the
nulla adipiscing elit, sed diam
feedback on their
collaborative discussions. Teachers also share their assessment of the student’s work
nonummy nibh.
understanding of
and participation and provide the student with strategies to become a better reader,
writer, and/or speaker and listener. As the teacher takes the lead he or she ensures
the ELA and
P E R S O N A L F I R E W A L L S
that the student has the opportunity to respond to the teacher’s comments and ask
Literacy CCSS.
Tincidunt ut laoreet dolore
questions.
Thank the student for the conference. Update your notes regarding how the conference
magna aliquam erat volut pat. Ut
went.
wisi enim ad minim veniam, quis
When to Use
exerci tation ullamcorper cipit
R
Before Reading
ESEARCH
lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex.
During Reading
Anderson, C. (2000). How’s it going? A practical guide to conferring with student writers.
After Reading
Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
Routman, Regie. (2005). Writing essentials: Raising expectations and results while
simplifying teaching. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
Grouping
Whole Group
Small Group
Individuals
Information Technology Solutions
Conferring with Students
A
A
BOUT THE
SSESSMENT
CONFERRING involves having a conversation with students about their reading and writing.
Conferring always has a clear purpose and predictable structure. Conferring can be used to
Common Core
inform instruction, monitor student growth, and provide students feedback on their
understanding of the ELA and Literacy CCSS.
State Standards
Strand
I
A
MPLEMENTATION OF THE
SSESSMENT
ELA and Literacy
I N T E R N E T S E C U R I T Y
Establish the purpose of the conference. On which specific area of the ELA and Literacy
CCSS will you be focusing during the conference?
Sit amet, consec tetuer
Establish a system of record keeping during conferences that can be used to inform
adipiscing elit, sed diam
Grade Level
instruction, monitor student growth, and provide feedback to students.
nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt
K-12
Set up the structure of the reading, writing, or speaking and listening conference. Each
ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam.
conference should involve conversations about the following elements:
1. The work the child is doing as a writer, the books the child is reading as a reader, or
N E T W O R K P R O T E C T I O N
the collaborative discussions in which the child is participating.
Purpose
2. How the child can become a better reader, writer, or speaker and listener.
Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam,
Use with students
3. Goal setting and monitoring.
quis nostrud exerci tation
to inform
During the conference the teacher and the student alternate roles.
ullamcorper.Et iusto odio
1. The student begins with the lead role by describing his or her reading, writing, or
instruction,
dignissim qui blandit
collaborative discussions as the teacher listens carefully and asks questions to
monitor student
praeseptatum zzril delenit
deepen the students’ understanding of the work
growth, and
augue duis dolore te feugait
2. The teacher then takes the lead role by questioning the student as they read their
provide students
writing, listen to the student read, or reflect on their participation in the
nulla adipiscing elit, sed diam
feedback on their
collaborative discussions. Teachers also share their assessment of the student’s work
nonummy nibh.
understanding of
and participation and provide the student with strategies to become a better reader,
writer, and/or speaker and listener. As the teacher takes the lead he or she ensures
the ELA and
P E R S O N A L F I R E W A L L S
that the student has the opportunity to respond to the teacher’s comments and ask
Literacy CCSS.
Tincidunt ut laoreet dolore
questions.
Thank the student for the conference. Update your notes regarding how the conference
magna aliquam erat volut pat. Ut
went.
wisi enim ad minim veniam, quis
When to Use
exerci tation ullamcorper cipit
R
Before Reading
ESEARCH
lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex.
During Reading
Anderson, C. (2000). How’s it going? A practical guide to conferring with student writers.
After Reading
Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
Routman, Regie. (2005). Writing essentials: Raising expectations and results while
simplifying teaching. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
Grouping
Whole Group
Small Group
Individuals
Conference (v.) to hold or participate in a discussion
Determine the frequency of
Determine the purpose of the conference
Determine the type of conference based on
conferences based on student need
based on student need
student need
Plan
to include student-initiated
Assess student progress
Whole group
conferences
Individualize instruction (using GRR)
Quick share
Monitor progress
Check In
Build relationships
One-on-one or Small group
Procedure
Sentence Starters
Whole Group
Build rapport with genuine interest
Look how this reader/writer has…
A public conference
Select a reader/writer to share in whole group
Right here, the reader/writer…
where other
Celebrate what the reader/writer has done well
Listen to these words…
students listen and
Target one teaching point at a time
Let me show you how…
sometimes provide
Give specific feedback to move the student forward
I’m going to reread this part again…
feedback
Select another student to provide the reader/writer feedback
Quick Share
Build rapport with genuine interest
I noticed you…
A public mini-
Select a reader/writer to celebrate in whole group
I saw you using…
conference where
Share the memorable part of a writing piece or the memorable
Listen to this line…
something is
reader/writer behavior
I saw _______ got right to work…
celebrated
Give specific feedback that includes the “why” behind the celebration
Check In
Build rapport with genuine interest
Let’s take a look at how to get started...
A semi-private
Note who needs help getting started
I really like how you…
conference where
Assess
So you’re saying…
the teacher
Affirm students’ efforts
Perhaps you could try…
conferences with
Target one teaching point at a time
I challenge you to…
students while they
Give specific feedback to move student forward on the task
Let’s try this together…
are working on a
task
One-on-one or
Build rapport with genuine interest
What are you working on at the moment?
Small group
Ask open-ended questions
Tell me about your text/writing.
A private or semi-
Prompt the student if he/she cannot articulate his/her need
Show me what you think is the best part of this
private conference
Use reflective listening to respond to the reader/writer
piece of writing.
where the teacher
Assess
Show me where you are struggling.
sits next to the
Target one teaching point at a time
Tell me more about…
student(s)
Give specific feedback to provide students with strategies and confidence
Perhaps you could try…
that they can take with them so that they can cope with the next
I challenge you to…
writing/reading task.
Let’s try this together…
Reference: Routman, Regie. (2005). Writing essentials: Raising expectations and results while simplifying teaching. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
Conferring with Students
Example of a Conference Log that could be used to confer with students about their speaking and listening skills.
Name: ________________________________________
Collaborative Discussions Conference Log
Date:
Focus:
Conference Notes:
Future Focus:
___ Has completed work prior to group work
___ Engages in learning
___ Gives evidence to support ideas
___ Asks questions to generate discussion
___ Respects the opinions of others
___ Extends others’ responses
___ Encourages others
___ Asks clarifying questions when something is not understood
___ Asks for evidence when something sounds incorrect
___ Restates, paraphrases, or clarifies an idea
___ Summarizes for understanding
Date:
Focus:
Conference Notes:
Future Focus:
___ Has completed work prior to group work
___ Engages in learning
___ Gives evidence to support ideas
___ Asks questions to generate discussion
___ Respects the opinions of others
___ Extends others’ responses
___ Encourages others
___ Asks clarifying questions when something is not understood
___ Asks for evidence when something sounds incorrect
___ Restates, paraphrases, or clarifies an idea
___ Summarizes for understanding
Date:
Focus:
Conference Notes:
Future Focus:
___ Has completed work prior to group work
___ Engages in learning
___ Gives evidence to support ideas
___ Asks questions to generate discussion
___ Respects the opinions of others
___ Extends others’ responses
___ Encourages others
___ Asks clarifying questions when something is not understood
___ Asks for evidence when something sounds incorrect
___ Restates, paraphrases, or clarifies an idea
___ Summarizes for understanding
Conferring with Students
Example of a Conference Log that could be used to confer with students about their writing.
Name: ________________________________________
Writing Conference Log
Date:
Focus:
Conference Notes:
Future Focus:
__Ideas: Focused
__Ideas: Focused
__Ideas: Developed
__Ideas: Developed
__Organization
__Organization
__Voice
__Voice
__Word Choice
__Word Choice
__Sentence Fluency
__Sentence Fluency
__Conventions
__Conventions
Date:
Focus:
Conference Notes:
Future Focus:
__Ideas: Focused
__Ideas: Focused
__Ideas: Developed
__Ideas: Developed
__Organization
__Organization
__Voice
__Voice
__Word Choice
__Word Choice
__Sentence Fluency
__Sentence Fluency
__Conventions
__Conventions
Date:
Focus:
Conference Notes:
Future Focus:
__Ideas: Focused
__Ideas: Focused
__Ideas: Developed
__Ideas: Developed
__Organization
__Organization
__Voice
__Voice
__Word Choice
__Word Choice
__Sentence Fluency
__Sentence Fluency
__Conventions
__Conventions
Date:
Focus:
Conference Notes:
Future Focus:
__Ideas: Focused
__Ideas: Focused
__Ideas: Developed
__Ideas: Developed
__Organization
__Organization
__Voice
__Voice
__Word Choice
__Word Choice
__Sentence Fluency
__Sentence Fluency
__Conventions
__Conventions
Conferring with Students
Checklists that students can use when conferring about their collaborative discussions and speaking and listening skills.
Collaborative Discussions
Name: ______________________________________
INDICATORS
WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE
WHAT IT SOUNDS LIKE
PREPARATION
Has completed work
Brings
“I have my calculator
prior to group work
text/supplies/assignment
here.”
to class
“My notes are on my
Takes out
desk.”
text/supplies/assignment
Engages in learning
Arrives on time
“My cell is turned off.”
Puts electronics away
“How about if I work
on ________ and you
Works with a wide range
work on ________?”
of students
“_______ may join our
Takes a positive role in
group.”
groups
“You may use my
Shares materials
book.”
Does equal share of the
“We need to ________
work
in order to meet our
Tracks progress towards
goal.”
goals/deadlines
SPEAKING
Gives evidence to
Makes eye contact
“On page ___, it
support ideas
states…”
Incorporates vocabulary
expected of the content
“I found another
Reads a passage from the
source that
corroborates …”
text that illustrates an
idea
“I found a source that
challenges…”
Brings another
information source to
“First…. Second….
support an idea
Third…”
Presents information in an
“… was a cause of …”
organized way
Asks questions to
Makes eye contact
“How do…?”
generate discussion
Uses open-ended
“Why does…?”
questions
“What do you think…”
Respects the
Makes eye contact
“Although I do not
opinions of others
agree with
Allows others to finish
____________’s idea,
speaking
she gave several
Comments on the idea,
examples of why she
not the person
thinks that.”
Minimizes gestures
“Another way to look
at it might be…”