"Deaf Child's Bill of Rights" - Georgia (United States)

Deaf Child's Bill of Rights is a legal document that was released by the Georgia Department of Education - a government authority operating within Georgia (United States).

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Download "Deaf Child's Bill of Rights" - Georgia (United States)

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Deaf Child’s Bill of Rights
The "Deaf Child’s Bill of Rights Act" is a Georgia law requiring school systems to take into
account the specific communication needs of deaf students, related services and program options
in developing an IEP for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Specific considerations
relative to these children’s IEP include the following:
The child’s individual communication mode or language, including one or more of the
following: American Sign Language, English-based manual or sign systems; or oral, aural, or
speech-based training;
Considerations:
The availability to the child of a sufficient number of age, cognitive, and language peers of
similar abilities;
Considerations:
The availability to the child of deaf or hard-of-hearing adult models of the child’s mode of
communication or language;
Considerations:
The provision of appropriate, direct, and ongoing language access to teachers of the deaf and
hard of hearing and interpreters and other specialists who are proficient in the child’s primary
communication mode or language; and
Considerations:
The provision of communication-accessible academic instruction, school services, and
extracurricular activities.
Considerations:
The school district is required to explain to parents of deaf or hard of hearing children all of
the educational options available to the child at the time the child’s IEP is prepared.
Considerations:
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Deaf Child’s Bill of Rights
The "Deaf Child’s Bill of Rights Act" is a Georgia law requiring school systems to take into
account the specific communication needs of deaf students, related services and program options
in developing an IEP for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Specific considerations
relative to these children’s IEP include the following:
The child’s individual communication mode or language, including one or more of the
following: American Sign Language, English-based manual or sign systems; or oral, aural, or
speech-based training;
Considerations:
The availability to the child of a sufficient number of age, cognitive, and language peers of
similar abilities;
Considerations:
The availability to the child of deaf or hard-of-hearing adult models of the child’s mode of
communication or language;
Considerations:
The provision of appropriate, direct, and ongoing language access to teachers of the deaf and
hard of hearing and interpreters and other specialists who are proficient in the child’s primary
communication mode or language; and
Considerations:
The provision of communication-accessible academic instruction, school services, and
extracurricular activities.
Considerations:
The school district is required to explain to parents of deaf or hard of hearing children all of
the educational options available to the child at the time the child’s IEP is prepared.
Considerations:
1
Given their unique communication needs, deaf and hard-of-hearing children would benefit
from the development and implementation of state and regional programs for children with low-
incidence disabilities.
Considerations:
A deaf student shall not be denied the opportunity for instruction in a particular
communication mode or language because (1) the child has some remaining hearing; (2) the
child’s parent or guardian is not fluent in the communication mode or language being taught; or
(3) the child has previous experience with some other communication mode or language.
Considerations:
Children who are deaf or hard of hearing may receive instruction in more than one
communication mode or language as detailed in their IEP.
Considerations:
Authority O.C.G.A. § 20-2-152.1
2
~~DEAF CHILD’S BILL OF RIGHTS~~
07 LC 33 1806
Senate Bill 168
By: Senators Smith of the 52nd, Butler of the 55th, Moody of the 56th, Mullis of
the 53rd, Seay of the 34th and others
AS PASSED
AN ACT
To amend Part 3 of Article 6 of Chapter 2 of Title 20 of the Official Code of
Georgia Annotated, relating to educational programs under the "Quality Basic
Education Act," so as to enact the "Deaf Child´s Bill of Rights Act"; to provide
for legislative findings; to provide for a definition; to require that a school system
will take into account the specific communication needs of a deaf student; to
provide for the explanation of options to the parent or guardian of a deaf student;
to provide that a deaf student shall not be denied the opportunity for instruction in
a particular communication mode or language; to provide for statutory
construction; to provide for related matters; to repeal conflicting laws; and for
other purposes.
BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF GEORGIA:
SECTION 1.
This Act shall be known and may be cited as the "Deaf Child´s Bill of Rights Act."
SECTION 2.
(a) The General Assembly finds that:
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(1) Students with low-incidence disabilities, as a group, make up less than 1
percent of the total state-wide enrollments for kindergarten through grade twelve;
and
(2) Students with low-incidence disabilities require highly specialized services,
equipment, and materials.
(b) The General Assembly further finds that:
(1) Deafness involves the most basic of human needs, which is the ability to
communicate with other human beings. Many deaf and hard-of-hearing children
use an appropriate communication mode, sign language, which may be their
primary language, while others express and receive language orally and aurally,
with or without visual signs or clues. Still others, typically young deaf and hard-of-
hearing children, lack any significant language skills. It is essential for the well-
being and growth of deaf and hard-of-hearing children that educational programs
recognize the unique nature of deafness and ensure that all deaf and hard-of-
hearing children have appropriate, ongoing, and fully accessible educational
opportunities;
(2) It is essential that deaf and hard-of-hearing children, like all children, have an
education in which their unique communication mode is respected, utilized, and
developed to an appropriate level of proficiency;
(3) It is essential that deaf and hard-of-hearing children have an education in
which teachers of the deaf and hard of hearing, psychologists, speech therapists,
assessors, administrators, and other special education personnel understand the
unique nature of deafness and are specifically trained to work with deaf and
hard-of-hearing pupils. It is essential that deaf and hard-of-hearing children have
an education in which teachers of the deaf and hard of hearing are proficient in
the primary language mode of those children;
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(4) It is essential that deaf and hard-of-hearing children, like all children, have an
education with a sufficient number of language mode peers with whom they can
communicate directly and who are of the same, or approximately the same, age
and ability level;
(5) It is essential that deaf and hard-of-hearing children have an education in
which their parents or guardians and, where appropriate, deaf and hard-of-
hearing people are involved in determining the extent, content, and purpose of
programs;
(6) Deaf and hard-of-hearing children would benefit from an education in which
they are exposed to deaf and hard-of-hearing role models;
(7) It is essential that deaf and hard-of-hearing children, like all children, have
programs in which they have direct and appropriate access to all components of
the educational process, including, but not limited to, recess, lunch, and
extracurricular social and athletic activities;
(8) It is essential that deaf and hard-of-hearing children, like all children, have
programs in which their unique vocational needs are provided for, including
appropriate research, curricula, programs, staff, and outreach;
(9) Each deaf or hard-of-hearing child should have a determination of the least
restrictive environment that takes into consideration these legislative findings and
declarations; and
(10) Given their unique communication needs, deaf and hard-of-hearing children
would benefit from the development and implementation of state and regional
programs for children with low-incidence disabilities.
SECTION 3.
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