"Prep 101 Consumer Info Sheet"

Prep 101 Consumer Info Sheet is a 1-page legal document that was released by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on August 1, 2016 and used nation-wide.

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PrEP 101
Are you HIV-negative but at very high risk for HIV? Taken every
day, PrEP can help keep you free from HIV.
What Is PrEP?
• PrEP, or pre-exposure prophylaxis, is daily medicine
• Daily PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV
that can reduce your chance of getting HIV.
from sex by more than 90%. Among people who inject
drugs, it reduces the risk by more than 70%.
• PrEP can stop HIV from taking hold and spreading
throughout your body.
• Your risk of getting HIV from sex can be even lower
if you combine PrEP with condoms and other
prevention methods.
Is PrEP Right For You?
ANY
PrEP may benefit you if you are HIV-negative and
of the following apply to you.
You are a gay/bisexual man and
You are a heterosexual and
You inject drugs and
• have an HIV-positive partner.
• have an HIV-positive partner.
• share needles or equipment
to inject drugs.
• have multiple partners, a partner with
• have multiple partners, a partner with
multiple partners, or a partner whose HIV
multiple partners, or a partner whose
• recently went to a drug
status is unknown –and– you also
HIV status is unknown –and– you also
treatment program.
º have anal sex without a condom, or
º don’t always use a condom for sex
• are at risk for getting HIV
with people who inject drugs, or
from sex.
º recently had a sexually transmitted
disease (STD).
º don’t always use a condom for sex
with bisexual men.
Visit Your Doctor
• To find out if PrEP is right for you
• If you have any symptoms while taking PrEP
that become severe or don’t go away.
• Every 3 months, if you take PrEP, for repeat HIV tests,
prescription refills, and follow-up
How Can You Get Help To Pay For PrEP?
• Most private and state Medicaid plans cover PrEP. If you are on Medicaid, check with your benefits counselo .
• If you have health insurance, you may receive co-pay assistance from drug manufacturers or patient advocacy foundations.
• If you are without medical insurance, consider enrolling in an insurance marketplace, manufacturer patient assistance program,
or your state’s Medicaid plan, if you are eligible for it.
• Learn more about paying for PrEP at www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/risk/prep/cdc-hiv-paying-for-prep.pdf.
For more information please visit www.cdc.gov/hiv
National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention
August 2016
Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention
PrEP 101
Are you HIV-negative but at very high risk for HIV? Taken every
day, PrEP can help keep you free from HIV.
What Is PrEP?
• PrEP, or pre-exposure prophylaxis, is daily medicine
• Daily PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV
that can reduce your chance of getting HIV.
from sex by more than 90%. Among people who inject
drugs, it reduces the risk by more than 70%.
• PrEP can stop HIV from taking hold and spreading
throughout your body.
• Your risk of getting HIV from sex can be even lower
if you combine PrEP with condoms and other
prevention methods.
Is PrEP Right For You?
ANY
PrEP may benefit you if you are HIV-negative and
of the following apply to you.
You are a gay/bisexual man and
You are a heterosexual and
You inject drugs and
• have an HIV-positive partner.
• have an HIV-positive partner.
• share needles or equipment
to inject drugs.
• have multiple partners, a partner with
• have multiple partners, a partner with
multiple partners, or a partner whose HIV
multiple partners, or a partner whose
• recently went to a drug
status is unknown –and– you also
HIV status is unknown –and– you also
treatment program.
º have anal sex without a condom, or
º don’t always use a condom for sex
• are at risk for getting HIV
with people who inject drugs, or
from sex.
º recently had a sexually transmitted
disease (STD).
º don’t always use a condom for sex
with bisexual men.
Visit Your Doctor
• To find out if PrEP is right for you
• If you have any symptoms while taking PrEP
that become severe or don’t go away.
• Every 3 months, if you take PrEP, for repeat HIV tests,
prescription refills, and follow-up
How Can You Get Help To Pay For PrEP?
• Most private and state Medicaid plans cover PrEP. If you are on Medicaid, check with your benefits counselo .
• If you have health insurance, you may receive co-pay assistance from drug manufacturers or patient advocacy foundations.
• If you are without medical insurance, consider enrolling in an insurance marketplace, manufacturer patient assistance program,
or your state’s Medicaid plan, if you are eligible for it.
• Learn more about paying for PrEP at www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/risk/prep/cdc-hiv-paying-for-prep.pdf.
For more information please visit www.cdc.gov/hiv
National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention
August 2016
Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention